A one day, all-women show! | Group Show

No Categories

Art Today with Lois Perry

Art Today courses are year long but students tend to continue year after year as they gain confidence. There is no set programme for these classes but rather the course material and topics considered develop from current events in the art world. These may be exhibitions or events in New Zealand, New York, London, Sydney or elsewhere.

There is discussion on exhibitions to visit locally and interesting art places to visit overseas. We also make class trips to galleries in Auckland from time to time, and students have the opportunity to visit art events in other places with Art Today groups.

There are no examination requirements and students are encouraged to learn at their own pace.

For further information or to enrol in a class, please contact Te Tuhi
(09) 577 0138
grace@tetuhi.org.nz

Click here for Terms & Conditions.

Accepting applications for Jutta Cuny-Franz Memorial Award 2019

Accepting applications for Jutta Cuny-Franz Memorial Award 2019

Accepting applications for Jutta Cuny-Franz Memorial Award, due Sunday October 14

Jutta Cuny-Franz Foundation

Museum Kunstpalast
Ehrenhof 4-5
40479 Düsseldorf
Germany
T +49 211 56642360
cuny@smkp.de

www.smkp.de

Jutta Cuny-Franz Memorial Award 2019

The award is granted to artists worldwide who make significant use of glass in their work. Participating artists should not be older than 40 years of age in 2019, and their submitted work (sculpture, objects) should date from the previous two years. Each participant may submit three works in the form of images. The awards will be presented in the spring of 2019.

The Jutta Cuny-Franz Memorial Award is endowed with 10,000 EUR. Additionally, two Talent Prizes are awarded, each with an endowment of 1,500 EUR. The awards and a number of Honorary Diplomas are granted every two years. A choice of entries for this competition will be published in the journal Neues Glas/New Glass.

Winners are selected by a jury, and there is no possibility of legal recourse. Current members of the jury of the Jutta Cuny-Franz Foundation are: Christoph Brockhaus, former director, Lehmbruck Museum; Mischa Kuball, artist and professor, Academy of Media Arts, Cologne; Dedo von Kerssenbrock-Krosigk, head, Glasmuseum Hentrich; Helmut Ricke, former head, Glasmuseum Hentrich; Elisabeth Scheuba, attorney at law.

Further information and online application here.

Application deadline: Sunday October 14, 2018.

Questions and feedback: cuny@smkp.de.

The Jutta Cuny-Franz Memorial Award was founded by Ruth-Maria Franz (1910–2008) to keep the memory of her daughter and artist Jutta Cuny (1940–1983). Jutta Cuny was a distinguished protagonist of European glass sculpture from the mid-1970s to her early death. Shaped by sand-blasting from solid glass blocks, her sculptures opened new paths into glass art. Ruth-Maria Franz established the Jutta Cuny-Franz Foundation in Vienna in 1984. By her request, the seat of the foundation was transferred in 1994 to the city of Dusseldorf. The foundation’s tasks are being managed at the Glasmuseum Hentrich, Museum Kunstpalast.

Museum Kunstpalast, Ehrenhof 4–5, 40479 Dusseldorf, Germany
www.smkp.de/en/cuny
cuny@smkp.de

Shannon Novak | The Expanded Gallery

Shannon Novak | The Expanded Gallery

Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin

In The Expanded Gallery, Shannon Novak explores the potential to extend his work beyond the physical boundaries of the gallery. Expanding from the gallery walls into a range of physical and digital realms, this is a project that explores the potential of an art work to create different layers and experiences across multiple sites.

Novak is a visual artist and a musician, and his work reflects his own experiences of synaesthesia – a perceptual disposition in which one sensory response triggers another (for example a visual experience triggering an associated colour or sound).  This new installation explores his interest in the ‘expanded’ experience; creating a series of layers that come together as the viewer engages with the different elements of the project in the gallery and beyond.

The Expanded Gallery begins as a physical wall-based composition; a series of abstract forms composed as Novak’s response to the gallery space.  The dynamic relationship between these shapes and colours are amplified by the introduction of light, with the composition seeping across the windows and reflecting back onto its original forms. Next, the installation places a layer of digital information over specific elements of Novak’s work.  Using a personal smartphone or tablet, viewers are invited to participate in an augmented reality experience –animated art works elegantly unfolding in digital space.

Beyond the walls of the Dunedin Public Art Gallery, this composition takes on a viral quality; it’s elements multiplying and extending across different networks that relate to the gallery in some way. Abstract compositions appear over public walls on Moray Place and the Dunedin City Council Civic Centre, each enhanced with virtual elements that may be revealed using a mobile device. More traditional painted works find their way into other sites; schools, businesses and other organisations that form part of the ‘expanded’ Dunedin Public Art Gallery network. Over the course of the installation, new elements will emerge in physical and digital forms, each operating as a trace of the original wall work, connecting it back to the source.  With each encounter or discovery, Novak makes visible the possibilities of an art work to expand across time, space and experience.

Jonathan Jones | Untitled (D21.281 GALARI BARGAN)

Jonathan Jones | Untitled (D21.281 GALARI BARGAN)

Opens Saturday June 2

Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin

In the 1920s the Australian Museum, Sydney exchanged a collection of Aboriginal and Papuan New Guinean material including a Galari (Wiradjuri) bargan (boomerang) with the Otago Museum, receiving two Māori amo (bargeboard supports) in return.  The amo, originally from the Hawkes Bay region, also connect to the unique concrete wharenui and church at Ōtākou marae on the Otago peninsula.

The ripples of colonial exchange continue to impact communities; Colonisation creating new global networks and relationships between indigenous peoples.  In early 2018 Sydney-based artist Jonathan Jones (b.1978), a member of the Wiradjuri and Kamilaroi nations of south-east Australia, visited Ōtepoti to undertake research toward a new work and discovered this connection between his Wiradjuri people and those of this rohe. Untitled (D21.281 Galari bargan) is a physical manifestation of ancestral forms and new relationships.

Gordon Walters | New Vision

Gordon Walters | New Vision

Opening Saturday July 7

Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, Auckland

Gordon Walters is one of New Zealand’s most important modernist painters. Across six decades he explored the potential of a few simple geometric elements with a singular focus, creating works of exactitude and refinement.

Gordon Walters: New Vision is the first comprehensive survey of the artist’s complete body of work and draws on paintings from major public and private collections across New Zealand. The exhibition provides an in-depth look into the history of Walters’ development, and reveals the different art forms which fuelled his vision and inspired the creation of his own unique visual language. The original black and white koru paintings of the 1960s are brought back together for the first time and are shown alongside never-before-seen paintings, studies and notebooks.

Gordon Walters: New Vision is a partnership project between the Dunedin Public Art Gallery and Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki with support from the Walters Estate.

Gallery entry is free for New Zealand residents, children 12 and under and Gallery Members. An admission charge applies for international visitors.

Image: Gordon Walters, Tiki II 1966
Barry Hopkins Trust Art Collection
Courtesy Waikato Museum Te Whare Taonga o Waikato and the Walters Estate

John Vea | Two Recent Works

John Vea | Two Recent Works

Opening Saturday July 14

Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin

John Vea is a contemporary artist based in Auckland.  Working across video, performance and sculpture, Vea makes visible stories of Pacific migration, labour and the lived experiences of minority cultures who he has consulted with as part of his research methodology.   Presenting two recent video works by Vea, this exhibition introduces the work of an artist committed to highlighting stories all too often absent from mainstream conversations.

Open Call | Depot Gallery

Open Call | Depot Gallery

Applications close Friday September 28, at 5pm

Depot Artspace, Auckland

Calling artists and creatives interested in exhibiting at Depot Gallery or who wish to run an event in 2019.

What they’re looking for:

  • Exhibitions and Events that build community and create opportunities for individuals to work together, increasing individual wellbeing, environmental and social justice.
  •  Exhibitions and Events that encourage courageous leadership where artists question, take a stand, and tackle meaningful social and environmental issues.
  • Exhibitions and Events that deepen our understanding of Te Ao Māori and celebrate Aotearoa New Zealand’s unique and evolving identity.
  • Exhibitions and Events that are inclusive, people-focused, fair and welcoming to everyone, creating experiences that make a difference.
  •  Exhibitions and Events that stimulate creative innovation, cutting edge art that challenges audiences, and invites interactive and engaging participation.

For more information/to submit your proposal visit: http://www.depotartspace.co.nz/exhibit-here/

 

 

Evan Woodruffe | the world is porous

Evan Woodruffe | the world is porous

Opening event Saturday Jul 28, from 10.30am

Tauranga Art Gallery, Bay of Plenty 

Contemporary Auckland-based artist, Evan Woodruffe, has transformed the Tauranga Art Gallery atrium with layers of dramatic velvet silk and vibrant canvas works in his solo exhibition, the world is porous.

Image: Evan Woodruffe, 8th June 2018 (detail), 2018.

 

Group Show | Iconography of Revolt

Group Show | Iconography of Revolt

City Gallery, Wellington

This show considers the ways artists, filmmakers, and designers have explored and contributed to the iconography of revolt.

It excavates history, from Varvara Stepanova’s Bolshevik sportswear from the 1920s to Emory Douglas’s Black Panther newspaper graphics from the late 1960s and 1970s. It also features Belgian artist Johan Grimonprez’s harrowing collage documentary, Dial H-I-S-T-O-R-Y(1997), which explores the romantic heyday of airplane-hijacking revolutionaries through the eyes of the media.

Australian artist Marco Fusinato creates industrial enlargements of news photos of the decisive moment in riots, when a protagonist brandishes a rock against a backdrop of fire. He also invites well-known graphic designers to remake a historic protest banner in their own distinct styles.

Dress code is crucial. Los Angeles-based artist Jemima Wyman explores the rhetoric of camouflage and masks, via the Zapatistas and Anonymous. In their trademark balaclavas, Russian punk band Pussy Riot are whipped by Cossack militia at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics for singing ‘Putin will teach you how to love the motherland’. Plus, there’s a promotional video for the London fashion label Maharishi’s ‘Viet-Afghan Coalition’ collection.

Also featured: Jean-Luc Godard, Giovanni Intra and Michael Parekōwhai, Oliver Maxwell, Dane Mitchell, Muslimgauze, Michael Stevenson, and Rosemarie Trockel.

Image: Jemima Wyman Combat Drag: Lessons in Unlimited Expansion 2008

The Review | Group Show

The Review | Group Show

Milford Galleries, Queenstown 

Artists: Andy Leleisi’uao, Galia Amsel, Israel Birch, Chris Charteris, Mike Crawford, Neil Dawson, John Edgar, Brett Graham, Michael Hight, Robert Jahnke, Yukari Kaihori, Karl Maughan, Mark Mitchell, J S Parker, Peter James Smith, Terry Stringer and Harry Watson.

Image: Andy Leleisi’uao, Undertone People of Angipani, 2016

Call for Entries | 2019 Molly Morpeth Canaday Award Painting and Drawing

Call for Entries | 2019 Molly Morpeth Canaday Award Painting and Drawing

Entries close Sunday December 2

One of New Zealand’s longest running and most vibrant national contemporary art awards is now open for entries. The 2019 Molly Morpeth Canaday Award (MMCA) – Painting and Drawing, has more than $20,000 in prize money for emerging and established New Zealand artists. The MMCA Major Award winner will take away $10,000, while the Akel Schulte Runner Up Award-winner will receive $4,000, and $2,500 will go to the winner of the Craig’s Investment Partners Youth Award.

 Eligibility & Conditions 

  • Entry is open to all who live permanently in New Zealand or have New Zealand citizenship.
  • Each artist may submit up to two works,  a separate entry form must be completed for each entry.The entry fee is $40 per entry, fee is non-refundable
  • The work must be in the arts discipline of ‘painting and drawing’ for wall surface hanging.
  • All works must have been completed after 1st December 2017.
  • Works entered must not have been exhibited in another public art award exhibition or competition prior to
    this exhibition.

For full conditions and entry forms click here.

Image: Hugo Lindsay, 2016 Major Winner

Call For Entries | ECC NZ Student Craft Design Awards

Call For Entries | ECC NZ Student Craft Design Awards

Entries close Sunday September 30, at Midnight

Since 1986 The Friends of The Dowse have offered their support to New Zealand tertiary students through an Award scheme designed to encourage innovation and creativity specifically in the areas of design and craft. It is the leading national award in this area.

Entries are welcome in the fields of lighting, furniture and product design, jewellery, and fashion and textiles. This is the only national award in New Zealand that celebrates creative students studying across multiple creative disciplines and from various levels of study including undergraduate and postgraduate programmes.

Eligibility:
 The Awards are open to full or part-time students enrolled at a New Zealand* tertiary institution during 2018, or who completed the final year of their course in 2017. Students must be enrolled, or completed a course in 2017, in a Lighting / Furniture / Product Design / Glass / Ceramics / Textile / Fashion or Jewellery related course (or similar) to be eligible.

For further information and how to apply click here.

Len Lye | Heaven and Earth

Len Lye | Heaven and Earth

Opening event Saturday August 4, from 6.00pm

Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth

Although well-known for the thrilling and sublime engineering of his kinetic sculpture, Lye’s passion for movement – across a variety of media that included film and painting too – went hand in hand with the seductive energies of the natural world.

This exhibition explores the environments that inspired Lye’s sense of wonder, from the crashing waves of his New Zealand childhood to the marvels of the heavens, both the scientific and mythic.

Image: Len Lye Moon Bead 1968. Photo Bryan James.

Sensory Agents | Group Exhibtion

Sensory Agents | Group Exhibtion

Opening event Saturday August 4, from 6.00pm

Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth

Work by Len Lye alongside installations and new commissions by Yuko Mohri (JP), Sergei Tcherepnin (US) and Danae Valenza (AU), three international artists working across sculpture, sound and musical composition.

Centred around Len Lye’s noise-making kinetic sculpture and a set of audio recordings held in the Len Lye Foundation Archive, Sensory Agentsfocuses on the role sound plays in Lye’s work, and links Lye to a younger generation of artists who share his interest in the capacity of sound and music to elicit sensory responses.

Image: Len Lye,  Grass 1961-1965. Len Lye Foundation Collection, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery.

Marie Shannon |  Rooms found only in the home

Marie Shannon | Rooms found only in the home

Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, Christchurch 

Rooms found only in the home consists of more than 30 years of wryly humorous works, including 40 photographs and five video pieces, by Auckland-based artist Marie Shannon.

Shannon frames the home as a space for making art. Her daily routine and experience as an artist, partner, friend and mother results in an art of immediacy, intimacy and wit.

Image: Marie Shannon New Zealand’s Funniest Art Video 1994.

Colleen Altagracia | The Slide

Colleen Altagracia | The Slide

Corner Window Gallery, Auckland

Emerging Auckland artist, Colleen Altagracia responds to closed doors and missing ‘welcome’ mats in her apartment building: tenants displaced, evicted, gone.

The Slide at Corner Window Gallery is Project 045 and the Final Project to be hosted in the space.
The project space will be disestablished in September.

Image: Colleen Altagracia, The Slide, 2018

Benjamin Work: Write it on the land, Seal it on the hear

Benjamin Work: Write it on the land, Seal it on the hear

Opening event Saturday August 11, from 4pm – 6pm
(Spring Exhibition Opening)

Te Tuhi, Auckland

For Te Tuhi’s Project Wall, Benjamin Work has created a wall painting which calls into question symbols associated with nationhood and identity.

The artist deconstructs the Tongan Royal Flag in order to address the adoption of imperial symbols, and the subsequent devaluing of traditional motifs, to fit within the narrative of civilisation imposed by the English, French and Spanish colonial powers. Work reverses this relationship by incorporating indigenous symbols of wealth and power. A fala (woven mat) will be provided for the viewer to sit on and engage with the work, transforming Te Tuhi’s foyer space into a site of self-determination.

Image: Benjamin Work, Write it on the land, Seal it on the heart, 2018, commissioned by Te Tuhi, Auckland

Hikalu Clarke | Accurate Community Projections

Hikalu Clarke | Accurate Community Projections

Opening event Saturday August 11, from 4pm – 6pm
(Spring Exhibition Opening)

Te Tuhi, Auckland 

When Victor Gruen designed the first enclosed shopping complex, he envisioned it to operate as a communal gathering site – a balance of commerce, entertainment and art, with the intention of reducing the necessity of cars and to reinvigorate a sense of community. Ultimately, Gruen’s vision failed as these mega structures only contributed to the suburban sprawl he attempted to combat. Two years before Gruen’s death, he renounced his utopic vision, claiming: “I would like to take this opportunity to disclaim paternity once and for all. I refuse to pay alimony to those bastard developments. They destroyed our cities.”

For the Te Tuhi Billboards, Hikalu Clarke co-opts the visual vocabulary of advertising and retail developers to question how these ‘public’ arenas entrench hegemonic power and operate as hubs for data procurement. Situated on the outer wall of Pakuranga Plaza, Clarke’s CG images reflect the fortress-like construction of these mega structures. Comprised of abstracted details taken from stills, the billboards speak a network language linked by captions taken from yearly performance reports. The language used is both painfully optimistic, and at times inhuman and cold.

Image: Hikalu Clarke, Accurate Community Projections, 2018, comissioned by Te Tuhi, Auckland

International Group Show | From where I stand, my eye will send a light to you in the North

International Group Show | From where I stand, my eye will send a light to you in the North

Opening event Saturday August 11, from 4pm – 6pm
(Spring Exhibition Opening)

Te Tuhi, Auckland

Curated by Gabriela Salgado

This exhibition takes its title from artist Otobong Nkanga’s performance piece Diaoptasia, presented at Tate Modern, London in 2015. Instead of departing from a theme, the exhibition’s foundations are laid from a selection of works on paper by Nkanga, which provided space for other artists’ works to address the need to challenge Eurocentric historical narratives.

Nkanga’s prints from the series Social Consequences engage with a number of issues through graphically sparse depictions of human bodies and natural resources caught in dystopian entanglements. Her work departs from the observation of stone and minerals to shed light on the contradictions of wealth-producing economies and their restrictive access to gains. Drawing eloquent parallels between minerals and language, Nkanga’s works depict humans that appear to be connected by tools through processes of fracturing, cutting and carving out, evoking language’s constant metamorphosis. Her analysis of minerals as a metonymy for society shows us that we are made of a great variety of elements that react to pressure, heat and other physical forces.

This exhibition encompasses works by international and local artists dealing with a number of poignant subjects in an attempt to shed light over the multiple manifestations of our contemporary ills as seen from the geopolitical south. Their insightful works remind us how the emergence of imperial capitalism in the early 16thcentury led the way to the relentless extraction of raw materials that has continued to the present day. They signal how such intense exploration of natural resources has unleashed what we have come to acknowledge as a migration and climate emergency, generating perpetual economic and human crises whose substrate all but hide the colonial wounds inflicted in the past.

In the same manner that dominant narratives have instigated a partial reading of human history to build a canonical version of reality, it can also be argued that the history of art is biased. Since the idea of Modernity was coined, ways of thinking about high art and craftsmanship have been largely determined by historical conditioning grounded in a binary model of conquerors and oppressed; educated and unqualified; masters and slaves; powerful and disenfranchised; explorers and providers; civilised and primitive.

By bringing to Aotearoa works from all corners of the world, the exhibiting artists invite us to share in numerous knowledge systems and histories which, as light emanating from their eyes, can help illuminate our path.

Image: Otobong Nkanga, Social Consequences I: Crisis, 2009

Maureen Lander | Flat-Pack Whakapapa

Maureen Lander | Flat-Pack Whakapapa

Opening Saturday August 11, from 4.00pm

Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery, Auckland

Artist Talk with Maureen Lander: Saturday 11 August, 3pm

Flat-Pack Whakapapa builds on the notion that our whakapapa is always with us. As such, her installations can be packed down into individual weavings: easily carried around, reconfigured and added onto later. This approach symbolises how our whakapapa grows with us, and how our genealogy is inherited and carried by the descendants who continue on our lines of heritage. The exhibition explores the connections between whakapapa and raranga (Maori weaving). Approaching these forms of human connection from a matauranga Maori perspective (Maori knowledge), Lander engages with weaving techniques—including whiri (braiding) and whakairo (patterning)—and the concept of aho tuku iho (ancestral lines handed down continuously from generation to generation).

Flat-Pack Whakapapa at Te Uru will also include two new installations made in collaboration with local weavers and school children. Developed both during and over the course of the exhibition, these new works continue Lander’s interest in how to address customary ideas in relevant ways for newer generations.

Flat-Pack Whakapapa is developed and toured by The Dowse Art Museum, who presented the exhibition in Lower Hutt, 2017.

 

Rotorua Creative Communities Scheme

Rotorua Creative Communities Scheme

Applications close Wednesday September 26

The Rotorua Creative Communities Scheme is seeking applications for funding for local arts projects.The scheme’s main focus is to stimulate and provide support to arts and culture projects which:

  • encourage community involvement;
  • support the diversity and cultural traditions of local communities, enriching and promoting their uniqueness and cultural diversity; or
  •  enable and encourage young people (less than 18 yrs.) to engage with and actively participate in the arts.
  • Please note that this opportunity is restricted to the Rotorua Area, as the project must take place within the city or district where the application is made.

For further information and how to apply click here.

Image: Affinity Light Installation, Rotorua Lakes Council Instagram, 24.04.2017

In the Hand | Group Exhition

In the Hand | Group Exhition

Sarjeant Gallery, Whanganui 

Including works by Madeleine Child, Octavia Cook, Tessa Laird, Martin Poppelwell, Richard Parker, Lauren Lysaght, Robert McLeod and Joe Sheehan.

This exhibition includes a diverse range of works by artists who have not only made their objects by hand but have made things that could literally fit ‘in the hand’. As well as a celebration of the handmade, the works investigate the small objects we encounter in everyday life.

Image: Octavia Cook, Mosapien, 2017. Photo Sam Hartnett, courtesy of the artist and Anna Miles Gallery

Artists Wanted | Japan Festival Wellington 2018

Artists Wanted | Japan Festival Wellington 2018

Japan Festival 2018, is an exciting and quality art event which will be held in Wellington. This is a one-day event, however we are expecting a large number of visitors during the day at TSB Arena. This would be a great opportunity for artists to release their artworks to the public with other artists who also have great potential.

Applications close when quota is met.

Exhibition period: November 24

Venue: TSB Arena

What they are looking for:  A total of approximately ten artists including Japanese residents of New Zealand, New Zealanders, and foreigners, all active in the fields of contemporary art.

Exhibition description: The works displayed at the group exhibition will share the theme: “Japan.” Ten artists who live in New Zealand will exhibit their works, each unique and according to the
artist’s particular style and method of expression, yet sharing one common theme: Japan. A highlight of the exhibition will be Japanese painters’ and sculptors’ works that use delicate, traditional expressions and techniques unique to Japan. These will intrigue the Japan Festival’s visitors who are interested in Japanese culture. In addition, the contemporary artists’ works will allow visitors to catch a candid glimpse of Japan, particularly in regard to the country’s recent development and the social issues concomitant to it. A calligraphy workshop is to take place within the exhibition venue on the 24th, the day of the festival.

Specifications of artworks and exhibition space: An art exhibition booth will be set up in the central part of the first floor lobby of the TSB Arena. Ten pieces of artwork will be displayed in an austere-looking, white, cubic space made by placing partition walls in square-form.

 Two-dimensional piece: 150 x 300 cm maximum or three-dimensional piece 100 x 100 x 100 cm maximum.
*Ceiling hanging of three-dimensional pieces is not available due to the venue.
*If you plan to build larger artwork than this criteria, please let us know.

They are especially looking for: Digital artists, sculptors, ceramic artists and installation artists.

For more information, enquiries and to submit you application contact: info@mikiwatanabe.com

Call for Applications | The Open Studios Project Summer Arts Residency 2018/19

Call for Applications | The Open Studios Project Summer Arts Residency 2018/19

The Open Studios Project is a Summer artist residency programme run by The Arts Village in Rotorua. The residency has been delivered since 2011 and focuses on providing artists with studio space, materials and a broad brief for projects that engage the community and extend on their arts practice.

The aims of the project are:

  • To enliven and enhance the community through engagement with the arts
  • To connect artists to their audiences
  • To provide an environment for artists and arts practitioners to fulfil their potential by having the time, space, and means to experiment and to be innovative
  • To support and further the development of artist’s creative practices

The project will this year award residencies to three artists who will share a studio as their own working space over the six week time period from mid-December 2018 to January 2019 . 

They will each receive a materials grant and a stipend to support their living costs during the six weeks. The amounts of the grants for the coming season (2018/2019) are yet to be confirmed. For reference, last season (2017/2018) these grants were a living stipend of $2000 and materials grant of $500.

The expectations of each artist will be:

  • To give a pecha-kucha style presentation at the start of the residency covering their arts practice and intentions for the residency.
  • To work on their own arts practice during the six weeks in an allocated work space in a shared studio (Studio Two) at The Arts Village.
  • To each carry out a minimum of 12 hours of free workshops/demonstrations/public talks for the public to participate in either to teach an artistic skill/creative approach, learn more about the artists practice,  or contribute to the creation of a community artwork.
  • To present a final showcase in the closing week of the residency open to the public which could include: a talk/presentation/works/performance. This will depend on the individual artist and how this suits their practice

Visit their website to download a copy of the application guidelines and form then submit your full proposal by 4PM, Friday 28th September 2018.

They will have an info session for potential applicants coming up on Monday 10th September 2018 in Rotorua at The Arts Village. Applicants are encouraged to contact them with any questions they have ahead of applying – their team is very happy to discuss and advise on your application.

Contact details for questions and applications:

Frances Berkers – Community Engagement Coordinator

The Arts Village,  1240 Hinemaru Street,  Rotorua 3010,  Aotearoa / New Zealand

TEL: +64 7 348 9008

EMAIL: projects@artsvillage.org.nz

WEB: www.artsvillage.org.nz

Call for Entries | The New Zealand Painting and Printmaking Award 2019

Call for Entries | The New Zealand Painting and Printmaking Award 2019

Entries close Friday November 9

This will be The New Zealand Painting and Printmaking Award’s 19th year, this award is an important event on the arts calendar in the Waikato and beyond. This nationally significant painting and printmaking award was established, and is hosted, by the Waikato Society of Arts. It offers one of New Zealand’s most valuable cash awards for New Zealand artists in the fields of painting and printmaking. The $20,000 prize is very generously sponsored by the Philip Vela Family Trust and they also purchase the winning artwork for their collection.

For key information and how to enter please click here or visit wsa.org.nz.

Call for Proposals | Tai Tapu Sculpture Garden

Call for Proposals | Tai Tapu Sculpture Garden

Deadline for submission is Saturday October 20

Tai Tapu Sculpture Garden, Christchurch 

Established and emerging artists are invited to submit proposals to participate in our Annual Autumn Exhibition (March 2019) which showcases the permanent collection and works for sale.

Tai Tapu Sculpture Garden are interested in concepts for three-dimensional sculpture in all media suitable for outdoor exhibition, participatory, socially engaged or performance works, sound pieces and light works. All work new and original work will be considered.

For full submission criteria and how to apply click here.

Invitation for submissions | The 4 Plinths Sculpture Award

Invitation for submissions | The 4 Plinths Sculpture Award

Application deadline Friday November 2

Forecourt of Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington

Key Points:

  • Proposals and all information must be supplied on A3 board(s). This must be printed or drawn and arrive
    at the Wellington Sculpture Trust by Friday 2 November. Email submissions will not be considered unless arranged in advance.
  • Proposals to be accompanied by a fee of $30, cash, cheque or bank deposit
  • The selected artist receives $40,000 to fabricate and install the artwork and retains ownership of it for subsequent sale or disposal.
  • Fabrication to take place in 2019 for installation in early 2020.

The Wellington Sculpture Trust commissions temporary sculptures at two yearly intervals for siting on the four concrete ‘plinths’ on the harbour-side boundary of the forecourt of Te Papa Tongarewa, the Museum of New Zealand, Wellington.

Through the quality of the artworks installed in previous rounds, the growing awareness and reputation of the project, and the prominence of the site which is one of the most visited in New Zealand, this project provides a prestigious opportunity for established and emerging artists alike.

To date six sculptures have been commissioned in this series: Green Islands by Regan Gentry, 2008-2010; Mimetic Brotherhood by Peter Trevelyan, 2010-2012; Out of the Dusk by Joanna Langford 2012-2014; Rita Angus used to grow her own vegetables, by Glen Hayward; a (very) brief history of aotearoa by Kereama Taepa, 2016-2018 and most recently, Other Worlds by Ruth Watson. Descriptions and photographs of these can be seen on the Trust’s website

For the full brief and how to apply click here.

Image: Ruth Watson, Other Words, 2018-2020

Laura Duffy |  Garden of Purity

Laura Duffy | Garden of Purity

Courtenay Place Light Boxes, Wellington

Garden of Purity considers how we read and ingest imagery, drawing links through history from art history to advertising.Duffy sees the works as being a layered conversation about Catholicism, advertising, abjection, and queerness.She uses edible materials as a starting point for the series of digitally manipulated photographs in the light boxes and online video works. The series intends to prompt questions about traditional notions of beauty and divinity by blurring the lines between repulsion and desire.

To view the video artworks and read the text that is part of the series, visit: gardenofpurity.space

Nicola Jackson | The Bloggs

Nicola Jackson | The Bloggs

Opening event Friday August 24, from 5.30pm

Centre of Contemporary Arts, Christchurch

Nicola Jackson has created her own version of an anatomy museum, filling vitrines and cabinets with a range of curious objects and adorning the walls with paintings of inquisitive characters. Interested in the intersections of science, psychology, museology and art history, Jackson’s work often has an autobiographical element to it. It is also humanist in nature, being about any old Joe Bloggs.

Hau | Group Exhibtion

Hau | Group Exhibtion

Opening event Saturday August 25, from 10.30am

Papakura Art Gallery, Auckland

Papakura Art Gallery presents the annual Tautai – Guiding Pacific Arts Trust supported exhibition. Hau is Maori for essence. Something that is left behind when someone passes on. Through photography, sculpture, jewellery and selected objects, five local artists alongside the community respond to memorials in Papakura and ask how do we deal with trauma, death and history?

Hau is an investigation around the unspoken stories of Papakura. Hidden histories and taboo topics are revealed through relatable considered narratives. Artists are asked to respond to issues surrounding historical social constructs within Papakura. Exploring memorials / or public markers of death from both a historical and contemporary context.

Hau pervades the whole body yet is not located in any particular part of the body. A portion of Hau can be gathered in a lock of hair, clothing or even from a footstep in the soil. A memorial, item or place where someone who has passed can possess a person’s Hau

Public Programme, Saturday September 8, from 11.00am to 1.00pm.
Grieving Through Art -Artist Discussion: grief can have a significant effect on ones life. Come and listen to a panel of artists share how they navigate the loss of a loved one through their art practice.

Image: E kore e ngaro, he kakano no Rangiatea,You shall never be lost for you are a sacred seed sown in the heavens, 2018

ARTWEEK 2018 Volunteers

ARTWEEK 2018 Volunteers

The Artists Alliance Volunteer Programme was established to provide art students and graduates with valuable work experiences to build a bridge between their studies and work environments in the arts sector. The programme is now calling for people who are interested in volunteering for ARTWEEK 2018. You do not have to be an art student or recent graduate, just interested in the arts of Auckland.

ARTWEEK 2018 is looking for a group of enthusiastic volunteers who can get involved in the following ways:

  • Help out during the Late Night Art event on Tuesday 9th October in the Auckland CBD, organized by Heart of the City. Involves handing out maps, directing the public and answering questions.
  • Help out during Electric Night event on Thursday 11th October on Karangahape Road. Involves handing out maps, directing the public and answering questions.
  • Help with the guided art tours happening throughout ARTWEEK around Auckland, which include tours of private collections, street art tours, sculpture trails, etc., with a knowledgeable curator as a guide. Get in touch for a complete schedule of tours.

No experience necessary, just an enthusiastic and friendly attitude.

Email Artists Alliance Programmes Coordinator Julia Craig at julia@artistsalliance.org.nz for more information and to express your interest in volunteering. Get in touch ASAP to secure your place.

Grant Stevens | The Mountain and the Waterfalls

Grant Stevens | The Mountain and the Waterfalls

Opening event Friday August 31, from 5.30pm

Starkwhite, Auckland

Stevens’ new exhibition at Starkwhite introduces The Mountain (2018), a moving image work exhibited for the first time here, and The Waterfalls, an ongoing photography project shot around New South Wales, Tasmania, and beyond.

Describing the process of creating the photographs, the artist relates how an initial Google image search of the waterfall he wants to photograph intentionally frames his experience. While actually capturing the image involves an authentic experience of being in nature and hiking to the falls, Stevens has already set the stage for what he’s going to see when he gets there, his experience is pre-mediated through the digital images he’s seen online. His practice asks: can we still have moments of wonder, reflection, contemplation? Even if it is premeditated, can it still work? Rather than reinforce idealised understandings of the natural environment, Stevens’ artistic strategy highlights the ways in which the ‘natural’ seems to increasingly stand in for contemporary modes of contemplation and reflection. The Waterfalls sits on the cusp of sublime and bleakly generic.

The Mountain is a computer-generated video simulation that changes and evolves in real-time. Its appearance is shaped by the interactions of numerous cyclic elements: the time of day, fluctuations in the weather, and geological forces. As a virtual camera rotates around the perpetually changing scene, deep geological time mixes with the fickle weather and the constant passing of day and night. An ambient soundtrack accompanies the video, programmed to generate and evolve through infinite permutations. Drawing on meditation and mindfulness principles, The Mountain seeks to represent and provide space for experiences of the ever-evolving present moment.

Image: Grant Stevens, The Waterfalls, 2016-18

Chelsea International Photography Competition | Opportunity

Chelsea International Photography Competition | Opportunity

Entries close: Tuesday October 9

The work of selected artists will be presented at Agora Gallery, an elegant street-level gallery located in the heart of the Chelsea arts district next to the High Line in New York City. Founded in 1984 by an artist, Agora Gallery is a contemporary art gallery dedicated to the promotion of national and international artists seeking exposure to the New York art market. Agora Gallery connects artists with professionals, art collectors, and other artists to create an ever growing family dedicated to the world of fine art. Cash prizes are also offered.

For the full list of awards, how to enter, and entry requirements click here.

Image: Misha De-Stroyev, Henningsvær Football Field, 2017.

From the Shore | Group Exhibition

From the Shore | Group Exhibition

Opening event Saturday September 1, from 4.00pm

Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery, Auckland 

Featuring work by Tracey Moffatt, Tanu Gago, Rob George, Nova Paul, Lisa Reihana and Tuafale Tanoa’i aka Linda T. Curated by Ioana Gordon-Smith.

From the Shore considers the influence of Māori filmmakers Barry Barclay and Merata Mita on a current generation of artists. Barclay and Mita were forerunners in making films by Māori, about Māori, for Māori. Through their work in film, television and writing, Barclay and Mita set out some core concerns of indigenous filmmaking internationally, ranging from control over production through to community-based models of filming and upending technical conventions, such as staged interviews.

From the Shore brings together contemporary works that echo Barclay and Mita’s strategies and philosophies. The exhibition takes its title from Barclay’s metaphor of indigenous cinema as ‘a camera on the shore’ that reverses the direction of the colonial gaze. Conscious of film as a political tool that could be used differently, the selected artists move between subverting conventional tropes and aiming for a fuller representation of indigenous people, places and ideas. Together, the works suggest an ongoing resonance of a rich indigenous film whakapapa and its generative potential for image-making today.

Image: Lisa Reihana, Native Portraits, 1998

Rachel Hirabayashi | Orogeny

Rachel Hirabayashi | Orogeny

Opening event Saturday September 1, from 12.00pm

Moray Gallery, Dunedin 

This exhibition is dominated by two of Hirabayashi’s ongoing series, High Country Lakes, and her geological series. These usually show either volcanic or faultline structures below. The mountains of Fiordland and the Otago coastline inspire Hirabayashi’s love of place and their geological makeup. Light washes the high peaks and Hirabayashi’s interest in geology produces the mountain building process. The structure of the mountain and valley is revealed with the lit surface or by the carved substance of Hirabayashi’s imagined world.

Elizabeth Thomson | The Greening of New Blueland

Elizabeth Thomson | The Greening of New Blueland

Opening event Sunday September 2, from 2.00pm

Pātaka Art + Museum, Porirua

The Greening of New Blueland presents some of the most seductive, lyrical and yet perplexing works produced by Thomson in the last 12 years. These works speak of our escalating world problems – global warming, over-fishing of the oceans, pollution and environmental degradation.

Thomson asks fundamental questions such as: how does humanity fit within the world of nature? To what extent are we part of, or distinct from our environment? Rather than offer simple answers, her works elicit feelings, reminding us of the exquisite beauty and fragility of the ecosystems we too often take for granted

Image: Elizabeth Thomson, The Greening of New Blueland, 2014

Euan Macleod | Painter

Euan Macleod | Painter

Opening event Sunday September 2, from 2.00pm

Pātaka Art + Museum, Porirua

Curated by Gregory O’Brien.

Extending the genre of self-portraiture, Macleod is an artist ‘prepared to push the boat out into uncharted waters and dare to take a risk’, as Peter Rose observed in his history of the Archibald Prize, which Macleod won in 1999. At a time when New Zealand society is thinking about environmental issues, global warming and the politics of water, McLeod’s figure-in-landscape paintings are as relevant as they are vital.

Māreikura, Wāhine beyond Suffrage | Group Exhibition

Māreikura, Wāhine beyond Suffrage | Group Exhibition

Opening event Sunday September 2, from 2.00pm

Pātaka Art + Museum, Porirua

A māreikura is an eminent woman of great standing. This exhibition tells the stories of twelve such wāhine who came from or lived in the Porirua region. From signing the Treaty of Waitangi, adding their name to the Suffrage petition, or helping their community, these women laid a path for those who came after them.

Interwoven with these stories is the work of ten contemporary women artists. These inspiring wāhine use their art to tell the stories that matter to them, to pay homage to those who have led the way, and to remake the world in their image.

Sunday September 2, at 1.30pm – MĀREIKURA – Wāhine beyond Suffrage exhibition talk by curators Alice Masters and Emma Ng

Image: Robyn Kahukiwa The Choice, 1974

Emma Fitts | In the Rough: Part 1

Emma Fitts | In the Rough: Part 1

Opening event Tuesday September 4, from 5.30pm

The National, Christchurch 

In her book On Weaving, Anni Albers writes about our tactile sensitivity and the surface quality of material, saying that we touch things to assure ourselves of reality but that most of our experiences today are with an already pre-formulated material rather than unformed material. Albers refers to this unformed material as material ‘in the rough’.

With textiles and tactility at the centre of her practice, Fitts presents collage and photographic work made during her recent residency at McCahon House, Titirangi, Auckland. These new works enter into an imaginative dialogue between the writing of Anni Albers, the interior design of Eileen Gray and the portrait painting of Romaine Brooks. Combining the site of the McCahon house and this group of remarkable historical figures new ideas of portraiture and architectural decoration emerge.

Image:  Emma FittsDetail from The Red Jacket, 2018

Step Size Zero | James Cousins

Step Size Zero | James Cousins

Opening event Tuesday September 4, from 5.00pm

Gow Langsford Gallery, Auckland 

James Cousins employs a range of analogue and digital techniques to create his optically challenging works. One of the key digital processes is using a Graphtec cutter set at ‘step size 0’ which allows for a regulated level of accuracy and optimum precision for the cutting of long lines, arcs and curves that form Cousins’ vinyl stencils. These stencils are later used to screenprint paint onto the surface of the works; building up layers to conceal and reveal. Relative to his recent work, these new works presented in Step Size Zero occur via an ensemble of apparatus’ to apply paint in ways that both circumnavigate a privileging of the hand, whilst enabling the forming of trajectories and orientations that inscribe the canvas surface.

The demands of these large new works pressurise ideas of precision. Embedded images afforded by the stencil, oscillate between regulated complex patterns and unregulated machine incidentals, slips, rumbles, blips, and bleeds – between the finitely precise and infinitely expansive. These works operate on thresholds between the painterly mark and image, between interior and exterior, the paintings entry into the world, and the world’s entry into painting.

Julia Holderness | Florence & Florence: other textile histories

Julia Holderness | Florence & Florence: other textile histories

Opening event Tuesday September 11, from 5.00pm

Ilam Campus Gallery, Block 2, Christchurch 

Working with a range of archival materials from the Macmillan Brown Library & Heritage Collections, Julia Holderness explores her own textile making alongside that of artist and teacher Florence Akins (1906-2012).  Akins’ documents relate to her teaching of textiles at the Canterbury College School of Art, and include lecture notes and other instructional resources such as colour diagrams. Holderness reworks them and presents their possible entanglement with the international Bauhaus movement. Connections are also made with Florence Weir (1899-1979), currently the only known New Zealander to have studied at the Bauhaus. In 1936 Weir designed the costumes and sets for a local Christchurch production, and these were said to have been inspired by her time at the Bauhaus. The production was never staged publicly, and in the absence of any surviving documentation, Holderness imagines these designs in an appliqué series. This exhibition is part of a Visual Arts PhD in practice-led research at Auckland University of Technology, in which Holderness develops practices of fabrication, approximation and invention to interrogate archives and their construction of art-historical narratives.

Artist Talk: Thursday September 20, from 12.30pm

Image: Florence Weir skirt design with battlement border (for Veronika, Act 1), felt and wool appliqué, 2018.

Michele Bryant | Ambitus

Michele Bryant | Ambitus

Opening event Wednesday September 5, from 5.30pm

Solander Gallery, Wellington 

Ambitus refers to the edge or periphery of an object or a cyclic rotation  “the going around”, to “visit in rotation”. Both meanings have relevance to the significance of waterways in our environment and reflect the constantly moving and changing nature of rivers and the competing demands on them as a physical and cultural resource.

Michele and her partner moved to Hawkes Bay three years ago and have been actively involved in various community and environmental groups with interests in protecting the waterways in the surrounding areas.

This group of drypint etchings and paintings is drawn from found riverside objects and trees that make up the precious environment of the Ngaruroro river near where they live.

Image: Michele Bryant, River Tree, 2018

Richard Adams | New Land

Richard Adams | New Land

Opening event Wednesday September 5, from 5.30pm

Solander Gallery, Wellington 

Born in London, Richard Adams is an Auckland-based artist, exhibiting since 1982. Richard regards himself as an abstract painter but draws inspiration from the colours, textures, shapes and surfaces of nature. Richard is also a well-regarded jazz musician, playing throughout New Zealand and internationally as the frontman of the Nairobi Trio. His music revolves around improvisation and the building of musical textures, equally reflected in his approach to painting.

“I like my work to have a certain amount of spontaneity to it. This helps me in feeling that I am the guide of the brush rather than the master.”

Richard’s music career has enabled him to travel extensively which consequently informs his inspiration for painting. Weathered paint on a boat in Dubai or an ancient wall in Spain may emerge in his paintings. These can be simultaneously landscape and surface as his manipulation of colour and light creates illusionistic depth.

Image: Richard Adams, Strait, 2018

wā o mua | Group Exhibition

wā o mua | Group Exhibition

Blue Oyster Art Project Space, Dunedin

Featuring artists Erin Broughton, Caitlin Clarke,  Nina Oberg Humphries, Metiria Turei, Nadai Wilson. Curated by Māia Abraham and Grace Ryder

wā o mua, an exhibition of five emerging practitioners currently based in Te Waipounamu, the south island of Aotearoa, acts as a karanga to Sisters Communing, presented at the Hocken Collections, Uare Taoka o Hākena. Using the concept of the exhibition’s title, wā o mua, we invite a celebration and reflection on women’s achievements and perspectives across generations and cultures, acknowledging the past to navigate the future. Using the items held at Uare Taoka o Hākena, each artist has presented a dialogue, bringing the people and histories contained within the archive to the fore, continuing and at times questioning the multiple narratives between the historical and the present.

Kai and kōrero: Saturday 29 September, 11am
Free to attend, all welcome

 

(Un)conditional V  | Group Exhibtion

(Un)conditional V | Group Exhibtion

Aigantighe Art Gallery, Timaru

(Un)conditional V is a partnership project between The Physics Room and the Aigantighe Art Gallery and is part of The Physics Room’s itinerant exhibition programme in 2018. This group exhibition includes Ana Iti, Clara Wells, Kerry Ann Lee, Miranda Parkes and Tim McLaughlin, who have been invited to create site-specific works for the internal gallery and the external garden and also negotiate the connection or disconnection between the two spaces.

Richard Adams | From Pencarrow To Waimarama

Richard Adams | From Pencarrow To Waimarama

Muse Gallery, Hawkes Bay

From Pencarrow to Waimarama, is the closing chapter of a story that began over 40 years ago, when as a young man, Richard Adams walked solo from Pencarrow to Waimarama. The three-and-a-half-week trek along the East Coast was both a physical and spiritual journey. Turning 60 last year prompted Adams to revisit the experience in the form of two residencies, one in Wellington and the other here in Hawkes Bay at Waimarama. This exhibition is a culmination of work that was created during these residencies.

In the Autumn issue of Art New Zealand, Don Abbott describes Adam’s paintings as “…an exploration and exposition of colour, tone and light which takes its inspiration from events and experiences that the artist has seen in the world around him…” in this case, the East Coast, from Pencarrow to Waimarama.

Wes Fieldhouse | In You the Earth

Wes Fieldhouse | In You the Earth

Orexart, Auckland

There is a cultural tendency to inscribe land as either feminine deity or something to be both worshiped while being broken, cultivated and fertilised. Both tendencies believe the inherent contradictions that exist between the romances of tenderness and care and the realities of possession and control.
Wes Fieldhouse‘s works in this exhibition reflect all of these environmental uses and abuses.
To make a landscape painting in the 21st century seems to be an almost quaint and useless endeavour. Yet, at a time when our environments are increasingly threatened, making space to revisit the genre seemed worthwhile.

Image: Wes Fieldhouse, Mount Manaia Study, 2018.

Sam Mitchell | Fight Like a Girl

Sam Mitchell | Fight Like a Girl

Opening event Tuesday September 11, from 5.30pm

Melanie Roger Gallery, Auckland

New work by SAM MITCHELL to commemorate the 125th anniversary of women’s suffrage in New Zealand.  On 19 September 1893 the Electoral Act 1893 was passed, giving all women in New Zealand the right to vote.  As a result of this landmark legislation, New Zealand became the first self-governing country in the world in which all women had the right to vote in parliamentary elections.

Mitchell presents a new series of works on both perspex and canvas depicting influential female figures – African American science fiction writer Octavia Butler, Classicist and Women’s Rights Campaigner Mary Beard, English author and literary critic Lorna Sage, and Novelist and poet Emily Bronte – a casting call of feminists.

Artist Talk: Saturday, 6th October, 11am – as part of Artweek Auckland.

Image courtesy of Melanie Roger Gallery.

a temple, a Commons and a cave | Group Show

a temple, a Commons and a cave | Group Show

Opening event Wednesday September 12, from 5.30pm

MEANWHILE, Wellington

a temple, a commons, and a cave is conceived as an urban enquiry into how disparate social, cultural and political genealogies intersect within a singular site. Woven together from the drift of ideas and peoples from across the Asia-Pacific region, this exhibition considers the following: how do we shape our environment, and how does our environment shape us?

How do we shape our environment, and how does our environment shape us?

Woven together from the drift of ideas and peoples from across the Asia-Pacific region, a temple, a commons, and a cave is conceived as an urban enquiry into how disparate social, cultural and political genealogies intersect within a singular site.

Presenting a range of video, sculptural and sound-based works, the artists in this exhibition employ a multiplicity of languages and strategies – translation and mimicry, deconstruction and whakawhanaungatanga – to navigate relationships with the present and with each other. Spaces of friendship and benevolence coexist alongside sites of creative labour. Overlapping histories and ideologies are mapped out on a malleable topography, providing playful interpretations of our current critical moment in the South Pacific.

a temple, a commons, and a cave is curated by Amy Weng, and is proudly supported by the Asian Aotearoa Arts Hui.

Image: Arapeta Ashton & Wai Ching Chan, Pātai / 問題, 2018 (video still)

Christina Pataialii | Debt

Christina Pataialii | Debt

Opening event Wednesday September 12, from 6.00pm

RM, Auckland 

Christina Pataialii’s recent paintings address objective and subjective cultural narratives that focus on more recent global shifts towards cultural and national redefinition, the rise of Western nationalist ideologies and current fixations on regression to a ‘golden era,’ contemplating the concept of a shared national identity.

In her new works, she considers an objective relationship to history and heritage, constructing pictorial spaces that deal with tensions between cultural attachment and detachment and the complexities between place and belonging.

Dane Mitchell | Tuning

Dane Mitchell | Tuning

Opening event Wednesday September 12, from 6.00pm

Hopkinson Mossman, Wellington

A solo exhibition of new work by Dane Mitchell.

 Working with a wide-range of mediums including dust, scent, bacteria, occult practices, and radio transmissions, Mitchell’s practice is concerned with invisible or almost-invisible forces and substances. His sculptures and installations tease out the potential for things to appear and disappear, testing the boundaries of empirical knowledge and rational thought.

For Tuning, Mitchell presents a large brass discone antenna that occupies the entire Hopkinson Mossman gallery space. Usually mounted vertically, a discone antenna has a wide frequency range that makes it attractive in commercial, military and amateur radio applications, and permits it to broadcast undesirable emissions from faulty or improperly filtered transmitters. 

In Tuning, Mitchell’s antenna is connected to a transmitter, generating an electromagnetic field across FM bandwidth. The audio-transmission is a ‘spurious emission’ (a term for any radio frequency not deliberately created or transmitted); a sound that is camouflaged in the broadcast spectrum amongst background noise, and presents as static or white noise.

The transmissions emanating from the antenna are temporal sequences, they can be ‘read’ or captured in sonic form, but they are invisible to the eye. In Tuning, the artwork stretches well beyond the physical, entering the broadcast space as a transmitted radio signal, spreading itself invisibly into the world. When tuned into it potentially introduces an infinite number of transmissions from beyond the gallery walls, disestablishing the boundaries that artworks traditionally maintain. The space between object, gallery, and viewing body is here imagined as something active and constantly in flux.

Salt | Group Show

Salt | Group Show

[tacit], Hamilton

Featuring artists: Leafa Wilson, Divyaa Kumar, Matavai Taulangau, Teuila Fatupaito.
Curated by Ellie Lee-Duncan and Ka-lani Ianusi

The River Remains; ake tonu atu

The River Remains; ake tonu atu

Artspace, Auckland

Artspace NZ is pleased to present The River Remains; ake tonu atu, this years iteration of the New Artist Show: Tyson Campbell, Wai Ching Chan, Faamele Eutale, Olyvia Hong, Bronte Perry.

The exhibition is conceptualised as a durational “event,” one that reframes ways of thinking and being for the artists, the institution and the audience alike. For the five artists the exhibition speaks to the process of rhizomatic creative exchanges central to the dialogues around the production of the exhibition. The necessity of dialogue to navigate both aesthetics and the social circumstances around exhibition is a central tenet for each artist in the show. The process emphasizes the notion of walking backwards into the future. The sight of what the exhibition is will be understood in retrospect.

The whakatauki, Ka mua, ka muri, aptly describes the practices by each artist alluding to the significance of indigeneity for their practices and in framing institutional dialogues. They are each examining where they have come from, what they have decided to bring with them to Artspace NZ, what priorities are paramount. In their hands, the gallery has, for the minute, been stripped of its primary function to present the outcomes of art practices and aesthetic research. Artspace NZ is now the site for the production of a series of ethical dialogues by the artists and curators who are together concerned with the aesthetic, the social, the economic and political realities of art production. The outcomes of these elliptical and vital conversations address questions toward art as a contemporary practice embedded complex, networked systems.

The artists speak of holding the institution “to ransom” in order to engage with and imagine ways to re-formulate these embedded practices. To this extent, the gallery is now a laboratory for these artists. The collective imagining of a variety of means to place the value and importance of the ‘social’ is at the forefront of this project ahead of any indexical aesthetic register or consideration of the commodity value of art.

 

The Efficiency of Upright Walking | Claudia Dunes & Tanya Martusheff

The Efficiency of Upright Walking | Claudia Dunes & Tanya Martusheff

Opening event Monday September 17, from 6.00pm

Pearce Gallery, Auckland 

An inquiry into mobility and shifting boundaries. The exhibition will consist of new works from both artists ranging from a field of burnt sugar stalagmites and Wardian cages made of Perspex.

Image courtesy of artists.

Deborah Moss | Chorus Of The Forest

Deborah Moss | Chorus Of The Forest

Opening day event Saturday September 22, from 2.00pm to 4.00pm

Grey, Auckland

“The forest is an invitation – beckoning you into both stillness and potent energy – into great mysteries; into the lungs of life.”

Image: Deborah Moss, Alive!, 

TWICE | DASHPERBAMBURY

TWICE | DASHPERBAMBURY

Opening event Tuesday September 18, from 5.30pm

Trish Clark Gallery, Auckland

Twice, an exhibition of selected work by Stephen Bambury and Julian Dashper. Curated by Bambury, Twice reflects on the enduring influence of the historical avant-garde.

Joyce Campbell | THE REEF

Joyce Campbell | THE REEF

Opening event Wednesday September 19, from 6.00pm

Two Rooms, Auckland

Joyce Campbell’s latest cinematic project,The Reef, explores an analogy between two dying forms: the redundancy of analogue film and the threatened status of climate stressed environments. The exhibition’s name derives from a moving image work which reframes 16mm film footage of waves breaking on an endangered coral reef in Fiji shot at dusk. Campbell has repurposed an optical printer to degrade the surface of the film with grit and sand as it is scanned to high resolution digital video file. As the image is captured over time the film becomes scratched to the point where it breaks down. The Reef is a kind of eulogy of film on film, as well as a call to protect the natural environment, the foundation upon which all technologies rise and fall.

Image: Joyce Campbell, The Reef, 2018

REPATRIATION  |  Areta Wilkinson + Mark Adams

REPATRIATION | Areta Wilkinson + Mark Adams

Opening event Wednesday September 19, from 6.00pm

Two Rooms, Auckland

A residency at the Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology at Cambridge University, UK between 2009-17, allowed Ngāi Tahu artist Areta Wilkinson and Pākehā artist Mark Adams to respond to collections in English and German museums. The pair produced unique silver bromide photograms of Ngāi Tahu taonga, stone tools, specimens of moa and other bones from archaic middens and archaeological sites on the east coast of Te Waipounamu. For Wilkinson, the project allowed a direct engagement with her whakapapa as a maker, and to produce new works from the absences in these photograms which directly reference the mātauranga Māori of her Moa-hunter ancestors. For Adams, the project opened a way of engaging with the colonial relationships these artifacts, taonga and specimens are enmeshed in without messing with them. Repatriation is a collaborative work returning the shades of this cultural material and new manifestations of it to our eyes here.

Image: Areta Wilkinson and Mark Adams, Z6469 Cheviot Hill. Collections of Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Cambridge, UK, 2017, Cyanotype blueprint.

Tina Pihema, Salome Tanuvasa & Natasha Matila-Smith | Clean Slate

Tina Pihema, Salome Tanuvasa & Natasha Matila-Smith | Clean Slate

Opening event Wednesday September 19, from 6.00pm

Window Galley, Auckland

Growing up in Aotearoa public schools, the artists in this exhibition have each had experiences with the nationally recognised School Journal. Since 1907, the School Journal has delivered Aotearoa-produced content to motivate, excite and engage young students. In ‘Clean Slate’, the School Journal is personified and used as a site and physical object for exploration; a site for production and self-organising, with particular focus on how the book encourages the dispersion of information through creative output and the collection and sharing of personal stories. Using the Window gallery space as an open journal and a live site for ongoing collaboration and disestablishment of hierarchy, the artists invite a series of collaborators, and at times the audience, to contribute to the aesthetic outcome of the work.

Window online

Hana Pera Aoake, Body fluids are poetic, not slime but nectar (1)

Rūaumoko squirmed inside Papatūānuku’s womb. Each time he squirms fire and rock and lava pierce through the Earth. As Rūaumoko grows he comforts Papatūānuku in her grief and lives in her belly keeping her company. Each time he rises up to the surface the Earth shakes violently and splits before Papatūānuku calms him. You said I calmed you the way no one else could, but now we don’t speak at all. In the apocalypse will you think of me? What if the rāhui will never end. Kauri used to grow in thick forests all across Te Tai Tokerau and down into Tāmaki Makaurau and King country. Some of my ancestors cut these forests down, some wept at their erasure. All the other trees started to rot in the green muck spilling in from tramper boots, the dairy sludge and the piss that stains Papatūānuku killing Tōtara, Tānekaha, Taraire, Tawa, Miro and Rewarewa. What happens when it’s all gone and can never be undone. Stay at home and drink a beer. Remember we are all just plugged into the Matrix. Queenie does a karanga at Honeanga’s tangi. Who are these people I dream about? They call to me in my sleep. Would you come to my tangi? The precarity of everything is a crushing weight for anybody to carry. Please help me I am hurting very much.

An interactive text by Hana Pera Aoake.
This text was written in response to Georgina Watson’s project Larks in the dawn, published earlier this year on Un Magazine. The text is availabe at http://unprojects.org.au/magazine/issues/issue-12-1/larks-in-the-dawn/

  1. Dodie Bellamy, “Sex space” in Academonia (San Francisco: Krupskaya, 2006), 35.
Local Haze, Celestial Waves | Group Show

Local Haze, Celestial Waves | Group Show

Featuring the work of Helen Dowling, Clare Logan and Jonathan Kay.

Weasel, Hamilton

Something unseen floats over this land. It hovers between the waking and the dreaming, seeping out into the small actions of a day, suffusing the air like an intake of breath. It can manifest as a veiled haze, not unlike what is seen in Kirikiriroa in the chill of a winter’s morning. This wordless force finds its way into the lives of those who bear witness to it, and here, has been transmuted – through paint, a camera shutter, ghosting its way through digital devices. The artists in this exhibition carry within their works echoes of this celestial wave, this ripple in perception.

Tailblazing | Group Show

Tailblazing | Group Show

Opening event Thursday September 20, from 5.00pm

Megan Dickinson Gallery, Whanagarei 

Trailblazing is a mixed media show celebrates the 125th Anniversary of Womens Suffrage in New Zealand – Whakatu Wahine.

Charlie Jackson | Queries

Charlie Jackson | Queries

Opening event Friday September 21, from 5.30pm

CoCA Centre of Contemporary Arts, Christchurch

Taking inspiration from the ebb and flow of everyday life, Queries is comprised of photo-zines that begin to search through subjects, thought processes and experiences.

Circling back to the humble act of looking, noticing and documenting, the zines create a platform for me to experiment within, with each one communicating a single feeling or circumstance. Charlie holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts majoring in Photography from the University of Canterbury.

The Future is Death | Group Show

The Future is Death | Group Show

Opening event Thursday September 20, from 5.30pm

Toi Pōneke Gallery, Wellington 

Artists: Taupuruariki Brightwell, Leala Faleseuga, Huriana Kopeke-Te Aho, Rex Paget, Janice aka Hy-bee Ikiua Pasi-Taito.

The Future is Death, curated by Leilani Sio aka Panda, asks what place migrant people have in a colonised land.  Emerging Pasifika artists reimagine a new existence for their people.

The artists in this Tautai exhibition use digital and mixed media, soundscape/spoken word, zines, photography and sculpture to expose how colonisation has blurred the ancestral connections of Tangata Whenua and Tangata O Le Moana. The Future is Death explores how to break free of the past and create a future free of the limits of somebody else’s imagination and structures.

Saturday 29 September 1 – 4pm, Raw Fish Live panel discussion, The Bungas Have Landed!

Saturday 6 October 1pm, Artist/curator’s talk: Taupuruariki Brightwell and Leilani A Sio Hiro’s Progeny

Image: Leala Faleseuga

Wayne Youle | Arjar

Wayne Youle | Arjar

Centre of Contemporary Arts, Christchurch

Created as part of Crux★Te Punga in response to the demolition of the Hereford Street Police building, Wayne Youle’s AJAR examines ideas about space, time, and access.

AJAR began with an interest in the text found throughout the holding cells of the now-demolished Central Police building, from the formal, instructional signage intended to ‘help the process’ and ‘make the stay safe’, to the text and marks left behind by the occupants. Exploring these oppositional writings led Youle to thinking about TIME and SPACE, particularly “a shitty, cold, and unfriendly space, and time that is taken.”

Like A Boss | Group Show

Like A Boss | Group Show

Opening event Saturday September 22, from 10.30am
Franklin Art Centre, Auckland
Artists: Charlotte Benoit, Toni Gill, Claudia Jowitt, Claudia Kogachi, Jill McIntosh and Christina Pataialii
Like a Boss is a group exhibition showcasing wāhine who are emerging as trailblazers in their field. 2018 marks the 125th anniversary of women’s suffrage in Aotearoa. The commemorative period gives us a moment to question; are women’s voices being heard? Is there equality for contemporary women artists in Aotearoa?

Selina Woulfe | Memoria

Selina Woulfe | Memoria

Opening event Sunday September 23, from 2.00pm

Masterworks Gallery, Auckland

Interaction with an object applies a special amplified significance and history to it, resulting in memories that become an essence and ‘soul’ that the artefact comes to possess.

With Memoria, Woulfe breathes new life into discarded objects, their form and texture become connective tissue between the strangers who possess them – a new significance is re-appropriated and reborn from the imprint of the old.
This new series of adornment becomes an ode to the memories lost when inherited objects are passed on to a stranger.

Selina’s work combines a strength of concept with a delicate touch. From graduation her work has garnered considerable attention, being included in the renowned Dutch art historian Liesbeth den Besten’s 2011 book On Jewellery: A Compendium of International Contemporary Art Jewellery. Selina was one of the few inclusions from Aotearoa.

Image: Selina Woulfe, Memoria

Stephen Bradbourne & Ruth Castle | Entwine

Stephen Bradbourne & Ruth Castle | Entwine

Opening event Sunday September 23, from 2.00pm (demonstration and talk at 2.30pm)

Masterworks Gallery, Auckland

Master weaver Ruth Castle and accomplished glass blower Stephen Bradbourne come together to explore their shared love of line and pattern. This exhibition offers a unique dialogue between makers in two diverse materials. For Ruth Castle fans this is a rare opportunity to see a large body of work and for those in travelling distance for the opening, to witness Ruth at work.

In conjunction with Artweek Masterworks will be hosting a special event to enjoy a behind the scenes experience to see Stephen Bradbourne at work. This event will be held Tuesday 9th October from 5-6pm, spaces are limited so book in early.

Images: Ruth Castle, Decorative Dish with Sunflower pattern (dyed Rattancore)

The Art Room | Manawatu Art Teachers Association Exhibition

The Art Room | Manawatu Art Teachers Association Exhibition

Opening event Monday September 24, from 5.00pm

Taylor-Jensen Fine Arts, Palmerston North

The MATA (Manawatu Art Teachers Association) exhibition is a showcase of our Manawatu Art Teachers and their personal artworks which are guided by each of their creative strengths. There are various mediums in the exhibition which include printmaking, painting, mixed media, glass and digital works. The biannual exhibition gives teachers the permission to explore and indulge in their own creative realm where usually that time would be spent helping, assisting and inspiring their students in the classroom. It’s an opportunity to show off their skills and celebrate what they do and why they do it, which is to continue to inspire the younger generations.

Expressions of Interest | RM Summer Residency Programme

Expressions of Interest | RM Summer Residency Programme

Deadline: Friday October 12, at midnight

RM Gallery, Auckand

RM supports and promotes new developments in contemporary art. This summer RM is opening up the gallery space to accommodate five practitioners who share an interest in using the space to work on their respective practices throughout January until end of February 2019.  Successful applicants will receive a modest weekly stipend to support their time at RM. At the end of the residency period, RM will facilitate an open studio event. RM welcome applicants from outside Auckland.

Please include:

Written statement of interest (up to 500 words)
Please include an overview of what you hope to achieve at RM, your background and artistic practice. Include 4-6 photographs of previous work, writings or other material you feel best represents your practice.

Artist CV
Your CV is not required, however applicants are welcome to include one.

Contact details
Please include a contact phone number and email address.

Email applications to info@rm.org.nz as a single PDF document titled firstname_lastname_2019_SR.pdf.
The deadline for Summer residency proposals is Friday October 12th at midnight.
Please email RM if you have any questions: info@rm103.org

Headforemost | Stephen Ellis

Headforemost | Stephen Ellis

Opening event Tuesday September, from 6.00pm

Sanderson Contemporary Art, Auckland

Stephen Ellis’s newest body of work Headforemost is a suite of four large scale, intricate ball point pen drawings that capture and comment on local history. Ellis’s works are awe inspiring. With a commitment to both process and the research grounding the work, he layers meaning and technique to create works that intrigue. Working in the humble ball point pen, Ellis’s large scale works are truly unique and have to be seen in person to understand his mastery of line, light and composition.

Image: Stephen Ellis, Capitalise, 2018

Kāryn Taylor | Elements of Euclid

Kāryn Taylor | Elements of Euclid

Opening event Tuesday September, from 6.00pm

Sanderson Contemporary Art, Auckland

This body of work is the elegant and simple outcome of Kāryn Taylor’s ongoing investigation into our physical and metaphysical questions of existence. Taylor looks at the properties of space and time, and how one might bring structure or order to non-logical ideas from the depths of our quantum reality. Elements of Euclid sees Taylor push colour more than ever before as she explores wave-particle duality, a concept within the wider field of quantum mechanics, where every particle or quantic entity may be partly described in terms not only of particles, but also of waves. The differing wavelengths that determine each colour, along with the solidity of the art object itself, recall these ideas in quantum physics.  Taylor works with colour as an expression of light as she attempts to solidify it.

Image: Kāryn Taylor, Hinge, 2018

Biljana Popovic | Synthetic Baby

Biljana Popovic | Synthetic Baby

Opening event Wednesday September 26, from 5.30pm

The Physics Room, Christchurch 

What do you think about when you are driving? For the cybernetic subject, deep thinking happens on the skin. The car is not an object to be fetishised, but a mediated lens, a transformative and existential machine with which humans have a reciprocal relationship. The car transforms how we know the world, and how the world is.

Using two pieces of recent technology—The Fortwo Smartcar and the Samsung Gear 360 camera, Synthetic Baby opens up a historical moment—namely the early 21st century—via a dance. This dance concerns the cultural role of technology, and it takes place between two sensibilities: romantic naturalism and technophilia.

Synthetic Baby is a multimedia installation that operates as a prop-opera where cyberfeminism, pop phenomenology, and theories of embodiment come together in a period piece set in the near-past. Building from previous work, Biljana Popovic explores the relationship between identity and the designed environment through the production of new socio-spatial contexts.

Tech industries do not expand in proportion to each other; digital technology is taking over the marketplace at such a rate that older tech trades like automechanics and architecture are starting to look like blacksmithery and stonemasonry. The technophile claims it is not enough to use tools, it is the love of technology that fuels innovation—and considers technophilia to be an equally legitimate position to romantic naturalism, equally capable of fighting for social justice and earthly survival.

What does freedom to identify mean in a period of sexual revolution, pumped up bodies, the metrosexual and the ‘Can I speak to the manager haircut’? Identity is losing its grip as an organising force of the body/environment/technology/politics assemblage. The feeling that washes over is a collapse between the natural and the artificial. We were always already artificial.

Public Programme: Saturday 29 September, 2pm. Exhibition Talk with Biljana Popovic and Jamie Hanton

Image: Biljana Popovic, Something Entirely Natural, 2018, film still.

Fiona Amundsen | A Body that Lives

Fiona Amundsen | A Body that Lives

Opening event Thursday September 27, from 5.30pm

ST Paul Street Gallery, Auckland

Artist: Fiona Amundsen with Fuyuko Akiyoshi, Kayoko Ebina, Ben Kuroki, Nobuyoshi Maehira, Asumi Mizuo, Teruo Murakami, Michiko Uehara, and Mami Yamada.

A Body that Lives brings together four narratives of personal experience linked to the Asia-Pacific War (WWII). These stories focus on the experiences of American war veteran Ben Kuroki’s struggle for recognition as an American of Japanese descent who participated in the aerial firebombing of his ancestral homeland; Japanese anti-war activist Kayoko Ebina’s description of the effects of these events, and the absence of governmental recognition; Okinawan anti-war activist and volunteer from Okinawa’s Peace Memorial Museum Michiko Uehara’s childhood memories of the 1945 Battle of Okinawa; and Japanese POW war veteran Teruo Murakami’s account of a mass prison-camp breakout in Australia, where just over 1,000 Japanese POWs attempted to escape, resulting in 235 deaths.

Through a series of photographs and videos, comprising present-day and archival imagery, this exhibition explores ways in which a camera can listen* to enable relationships with alternative acts of memorialising and remembering painful experiences associated with Asia-Pacific War histories. The works seek to disrupt the unity of collective narratives promoted by official memorialisation and other forms of government acknowledgement of this conflict, thereby creating space for counter-histories that critique both Japanese and American colonial imperial war acts. A Body that Lives resists providing concrete ethical assurance regarding subjectivity and the politics of representing this now seventy-three year history. These artworks ask viewers to confront their own expectations of images and testimony—looking does not necessarily lead to knowing. There is instead a focus on other forms of knowing that are premised in an ethics of visual listening, which is based in intersubjective relationships of care, trust and love.

* This idea of listening is based on indigenous filmmaker Barry Barclay’s proposition: “I believe we might do well to further explore how to make the camera a listener. As a Māori, you are taught how to listen, you sit at the feet and open your ears…the knowledge is gifted to you at appropriate times and appropriate places.” Barry Barclay, Our Own Image: A Story of a Māori Filmmaker (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1990), 17.

Image: Fiona Amundsen, Small Tree growing near Shin-Ohasi-dori, Morishita, Koto Ward, Tokyo, 06/02/2017, 7.22 (for Ebina san and 100,000 kami), 2017. Inkjet Photograph, 1000 x 800mm. Image courtesy of the artist

Flight Path | Don Binney

Flight Path | Don Binney

Opening event Saturday September 29, from 5.00pm

The Diversion Gallery, Marlborough

Join Philippa and Mary Binney, to celebrate Don Binney’s rare drawings, Artist’s Proofs, and other treasures from the studio collection, dating from the 1960s to 2011. The release of these works for sale will underpin a definitive book on the late Don Binney, icon of New Zealand art, by noted arts writer Gregory O’Brien in association with Auckland University Press.

‘As well as being a conservationist and hiker, Binney was an ornithologist, a student of natural and human histories, a teacher and an autodidact, a traveller and a great believer in staying at home.  The book will offer an account of a restless, unpredictable, searching personality—and of an art deeply embedded in notions of the local, regional and national.’  – Gregory O’Brien on Don Binney, September 2018.

Few enough of Don Binney’s works remained in his own studio collection, such was the following for his work throughout his career. It is a privilege to present this remarkable selection, celebrated appropriately by finely crafted wines from Forrest Estate.

Image: Manunui, Otakamiro, 2010

Lakiloko Keakea | Fafetu

Lakiloko Keakea | Fafetu

Objectspace, Auckland

Lakiloko Keakea’s fafetu are kaleidoscopic – mesmerising, brightly-lit, and filled with an array of extraordinary patterns. While Lakiloko takes a six or seven pointed star as her frame again and again, no two pieces are identical – their interiors are each intricately singular and individual.

Fafetu is the first major solo exhibition of Lakiloko’s work, featuring pieces produced within the last two years, building on a practice of over five decades.

Lakiloko’s fafetu mix a boldness of colour with a delicacy of action – crafted using a number of distinct weaving and crochet techniques, including tio: a type of kolose (Tuvalu crochet) and lalanga (weaving with a needle). Her fafetu embody the Tuvalu approach to living; infused with repeating actions, popping colours and an undeniable vibrancy. The work holds the same bright spirit of celebration that is seen in kolose and fatele (Tuvalu dancing accompanied by song), with all rhythms leading back towards a place of culture.

Lakiloko’s fafetu are woven with an intuitive approach; emerging unplanned, without patterns, allowing colour combinations to form as the threads unspool. Her wild palette demonstrates the Tuvalu delight in vibrant colour – seen also in kolose, and Tuvalu celebratory garments. On the atolls, many of these colours are created using plant-based dyes on fibre. An expansion in material options came with Lakiloko’s move to Aotearoa in 1996, providing a greater range of bright, synthetic materials to weave alongside their natural counterparts.

The works featured in Fafetu have been created using a mix of manufactured and natural materials including wool, synthetic ribbon, cloth ribbon, and plastic cargo ties. The largest piece commissioned for the exhibition (Lakiloko’s biggest fafetu to date) has been woven for the first time on a steel frame fabricated specifically for Fafetu – expanding Lakiloko’s work to a previously untested scale.

Lakiloko is a prolific maker – in her endless rhythm of knotting and weaving, her practice is making as living – an entwining of threads with daily tasks. She continues to work at her house in Ranui, surrounded by the comings and goings of friends and relatives – her mesmerising objects emerging from the most domestic and well-known of environments – their production an integrated part of the flow of home and family.

To Weave Again | Fafine Niutao | Aotearoa

To Weave Again | Fafine Niutao | Aotearoa

Objectspace, Auckland

Fafine Niutao I Aotearoa is a New Zealand-based female arts collective from Niutao Island, Tuvalu.

The group was formed in 2012 and currently numbers around 100 women, over a wide span of ages. Many of Fafine Niutao I Aotearoa’s members are based in Auckland; with a core group of elder members gathering every Thursday to make together, at the Pacifica Arts Centre, at Corban Estate Arts Centre in Henderson. As a group, the women practice a range of Tuvalu art-forms, including kolose (Tuvalu crochet), and the weaving of usable objects such as fans, baskets and trays.

To Weave Again has seen the collective return to Tuvalu mat weaving, using fibre from pandanus leaves.

As the palm-like pandanus tree does not grow in Aotearoa, pufasa (reams) of leaves have been harvested by family members on Niutao, Tuvalu, and shipped to New Zealand to resource this project. For some members, this has been a return to pandanus weaving after a break of decades, with many of the group migrating from Niutao in the late 90’s and early 2000’s. Members of Fafine Niutao I Aotearoa divided themselves into suburbs to produce these mats, with one group working in Massey, and another in Ranui (these Western suburbs are home to a large portion of Auckland’s Tuvaluan community, with many families based in this area).

The collective are now working to continue the art-form, using the customary bark and roots to dye fibre prior to weaving. A red colour is created using the root of the nonu tree, while the bark of the togo tree is scraped to produce the black. To Weave Again demonstrates the Niutao approach to pandanus weaving – incorporating motifs of dyed fibre into the main body of weaving – with coloured, decorative elements seamlessly woven in as the entire mat progresses. On other atolls, it is common to complete a plain mat, before weaving coloured motifs into the finished article.

Fafine Niutao I Aotearoa is committed to teaching young women from their community to weave – ensuring the tactile knowledge may be passed on. To Weave Again marks the beginning of an ongoing transmission of practice between locale and generations. The travelling pandanus leaves have made their own journey of migration, bringing with them an opportunity for Fafine Niutao I Aotearoa to re-engage with an integral part of Tuvalu art-making.

Image: Joyce Evoli, Muao Keakea, Faifaiga Tekino, Alefata Kauapi, 2018.

Eduardo Abaroa | Fields and Notions

Eduardo Abaroa | Fields and Notions

Opening Wednesday October 3, from 5.30pm

The Engine Room, Wellington

Abaroa’s work has engaged a myriad of artistic processes and topics that correspond to the ever-changing context of his home country. In Fields and Notions Abaroa excavates his personal archive of video works, dating back to the early nineties when he was an art student. Abaroa brings these works into dialogue with new videos, drawings and objects he has collected and made during his time in Aotearoa/New Zealand.

The selection of works in Fields and Notions is connected by Abaroa’s investigation of the roles played by contemporary and public art: precarious narratives are transcribed to provoke thoughts and emotions beyond the artist’s intentions. Abaroa says “art is not practiced here as a place of propaganda or enlightenment, but rather as a misstep which forces us, under the proper conditions, to move in a previously unexpected direction.”

 

Samantha Matthews | Roam

Samantha Matthews | Roam

Opening event Friday October 5

Space Studio and Galllery, Manawatu-Whanganui

A new collection of photographic works exploring a South Island sense of place.

What’s possible next? | Auckland Artweek Workshop

What’s possible next? | Auckland Artweek Workshop

Workshop will take place on Sunday October 7, from 9.30am to 11.30am

A small idea development workshop for half a dozen makers – set in a studio environment and facilitated by artist and experienced art educator Deborah Crowe. Explore processes for generating, developing and expressing ideas in and about your practice. Consider ideas, trial creative strategies for problem solving and learn techniques to become ‘unstuck’. Bring a recent piece of work (or image of a recent work). Limited places email contact@crowecreative.net to secure your place.

Ioana Gordon-Smith, Pocket Histories | Artist Talk

Ioana Gordon-Smith, Pocket Histories | Artist Talk

Event: Saturday October 13, from 11.00am

The Dowse Art Museum, Wellington 

Join Te Uru curator Ioana Gordon-Smith to hear about her collaboration with artist Imogen Taylor to develop Pocket Histories, which explores three contemporary artists’ relationships with modernism

To register for this free seminar click here.