Ko au te au/I am the ocean | ST PAUL St Symposium

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Art Today with Lois Perry

Art Today courses are year long but students tend to continue year after year as they gain confidence. There is no set programme for these classes but rather the course material and topics considered develop from current events in the art world. These may be exhibitions or events in New Zealand, New York, London, Sydney or elsewhere.

There is discussion on exhibitions to visit locally and interesting art places to visit overseas. We also make class trips to galleries in Auckland from time to time, and students have the opportunity to visit art events in other places with Art Today groups.

There are no examination requirements and students are encouraged to learn at their own pace.

For further information or to enrol in a class, please contact Te Tuhi
(09) 577 0138
grace@tetuhi.org.nz

Click here for Terms & Conditions.

Accepting applications for Jutta Cuny-Franz Memorial Award 2019

Accepting applications for Jutta Cuny-Franz Memorial Award 2019

Accepting applications for Jutta Cuny-Franz Memorial Award, due Sunday October 14

Jutta Cuny-Franz Foundation

Museum Kunstpalast
Ehrenhof 4-5
40479 Düsseldorf
Germany
T +49 211 56642360
cuny@smkp.de

www.smkp.de

Jutta Cuny-Franz Memorial Award 2019

The award is granted to artists worldwide who make significant use of glass in their work. Participating artists should not be older than 40 years of age in 2019, and their submitted work (sculpture, objects) should date from the previous two years. Each participant may submit three works in the form of images. The awards will be presented in the spring of 2019.

The Jutta Cuny-Franz Memorial Award is endowed with 10,000 EUR. Additionally, two Talent Prizes are awarded, each with an endowment of 1,500 EUR. The awards and a number of Honorary Diplomas are granted every two years. A choice of entries for this competition will be published in the journal Neues Glas/New Glass.

Winners are selected by a jury, and there is no possibility of legal recourse. Current members of the jury of the Jutta Cuny-Franz Foundation are: Christoph Brockhaus, former director, Lehmbruck Museum; Mischa Kuball, artist and professor, Academy of Media Arts, Cologne; Dedo von Kerssenbrock-Krosigk, head, Glasmuseum Hentrich; Helmut Ricke, former head, Glasmuseum Hentrich; Elisabeth Scheuba, attorney at law.

Further information and online application here.

Application deadline: Sunday October 14, 2018.

Questions and feedback: cuny@smkp.de.

The Jutta Cuny-Franz Memorial Award was founded by Ruth-Maria Franz (1910–2008) to keep the memory of her daughter and artist Jutta Cuny (1940–1983). Jutta Cuny was a distinguished protagonist of European glass sculpture from the mid-1970s to her early death. Shaped by sand-blasting from solid glass blocks, her sculptures opened new paths into glass art. Ruth-Maria Franz established the Jutta Cuny-Franz Foundation in Vienna in 1984. By her request, the seat of the foundation was transferred in 1994 to the city of Dusseldorf. The foundation’s tasks are being managed at the Glasmuseum Hentrich, Museum Kunstpalast.

Museum Kunstpalast, Ehrenhof 4–5, 40479 Dusseldorf, Germany
www.smkp.de/en/cuny
cuny@smkp.de

Shannon Novak | The Expanded Gallery

Shannon Novak | The Expanded Gallery

Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin

In The Expanded Gallery, Shannon Novak explores the potential to extend his work beyond the physical boundaries of the gallery. Expanding from the gallery walls into a range of physical and digital realms, this is a project that explores the potential of an art work to create different layers and experiences across multiple sites.

Novak is a visual artist and a musician, and his work reflects his own experiences of synaesthesia – a perceptual disposition in which one sensory response triggers another (for example a visual experience triggering an associated colour or sound).  This new installation explores his interest in the ‘expanded’ experience; creating a series of layers that come together as the viewer engages with the different elements of the project in the gallery and beyond.

The Expanded Gallery begins as a physical wall-based composition; a series of abstract forms composed as Novak’s response to the gallery space.  The dynamic relationship between these shapes and colours are amplified by the introduction of light, with the composition seeping across the windows and reflecting back onto its original forms. Next, the installation places a layer of digital information over specific elements of Novak’s work.  Using a personal smartphone or tablet, viewers are invited to participate in an augmented reality experience –animated art works elegantly unfolding in digital space.

Beyond the walls of the Dunedin Public Art Gallery, this composition takes on a viral quality; it’s elements multiplying and extending across different networks that relate to the gallery in some way. Abstract compositions appear over public walls on Moray Place and the Dunedin City Council Civic Centre, each enhanced with virtual elements that may be revealed using a mobile device. More traditional painted works find their way into other sites; schools, businesses and other organisations that form part of the ‘expanded’ Dunedin Public Art Gallery network. Over the course of the installation, new elements will emerge in physical and digital forms, each operating as a trace of the original wall work, connecting it back to the source.  With each encounter or discovery, Novak makes visible the possibilities of an art work to expand across time, space and experience.

Call for Entries |  Aesthetica Art Prize

Call for Entries | Aesthetica Art Prize

Submissions due Friday August 31 2018

The Aesthetica Art Prize is now open for entries. It is a fantastic opportunity for artists, both established and emerging to further their careers in the art world and showcase their work to a wider audience.

The internationally renowned award nurtures and supports talented practitioners from around the world, aiming to unite and provide a diverse platform for artists.

Furthering the career of many artists, the Prize is an opportunity for artists to gain further exposure through publication in the Future Now: 100 Contemporary Artists annual and have the chance to exhibit their work at the Aesthetica Art Prize Exhibition, hosted in the historic city of York, UK.

There are two categories for entry; the Emerging Prize which is open to current students and artists who have graduated within the last two years, and the Main Prize, open to all including those eligible for the Emerging Prize.

Artists can submit work to one of four categories; Photographic & Digital Art; Three-Dimensional Design & Sculpture; Painting, Drawing & Mixed Media and Video; and Installation & Performance.

Prizes include; £5,000 for the Main Prize, £1,000 for the Emerging Prize, group exhibition hosted by Aesthetica, Editorial coverage, Publication in the Future Now annual, art supplies and books supplied by Prize sponsors.

Visit: www.aestheticamagazine.com/artprize

 

Jonathan Jones | Untitled (D21.281 GALARI BARGAN)

Jonathan Jones | Untitled (D21.281 GALARI BARGAN)

Opens Saturday June 2

Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin

In the 1920s the Australian Museum, Sydney exchanged a collection of Aboriginal and Papuan New Guinean material including a Galari (Wiradjuri) bargan (boomerang) with the Otago Museum, receiving two Māori amo (bargeboard supports) in return.  The amo, originally from the Hawkes Bay region, also connect to the unique concrete wharenui and church at Ōtākou marae on the Otago peninsula.

The ripples of colonial exchange continue to impact communities; Colonisation creating new global networks and relationships between indigenous peoples.  In early 2018 Sydney-based artist Jonathan Jones (b.1978), a member of the Wiradjuri and Kamilaroi nations of south-east Australia, visited Ōtepoti to undertake research toward a new work and discovered this connection between his Wiradjuri people and those of this rohe. Untitled (D21.281 Galari bargan) is a physical manifestation of ancestral forms and new relationships.

Call for Entries | Impressions National Art Awards 2018

Call for Entries | Impressions National Art Awards 2018

Entries due Friday August 31 2018

Impressions are proud to sponsor this national art award open to all New Zealand residents

The 2017 Awards were organised and managed by the newly-formed Tasman Art Focus Group. This year’s organising panel was led by nationally recognised Ruby Coast artist printmaker, Graeme Stradling and supported by fellow artist Glenys Forbes. Lewis Della Bosca of Impressions also provided input into the group.

The 2018 Impressions National Art Awards entry forms are now available to download below

Download the Impressions National Art Award Criteria as a PDF HERE

Image: Impressions Supreme Award: “Violet II” by Sally Barron

Richard Stratton | Living History

Richard Stratton | Living History

Opens Saturday June 9

The Suter, Nelson

Brutalist architecture, Russian constructivism, broken ceramics scavenged from the river Thames and the everyday realities of suburban life have all influenced this new body of work by ceramic artist Richard Stratton.

Over his twenty-year career, Stratton has become known for creating intricate domestic ware, juxtaposing historical ceramic techniques with decorations that reference pop culture. In Living History Stratton extends these ideas, as the result of his 2015 residency at Guldagergaard, an international ceramic research centre in Denmark. The residency inspired him to move away from figurative representation into enigmatic, abstracted forms.

Stratton’s work is unusual in that instead of stemming from Asian ceramic traditions—as many other studio potters’ practices do—it develops out of European industrial production. For Living History, he created over 200 variants of redware and black basalt stoneware clay by eighteenth century potters William Greatbatch and Josiah Wedgwood. In reproducing clays from the European industrial revolution, Stratton acknowledges that objects such as bricks, chimneys and even toilets are just as important to our heritage as our nationally treasured Crown Lynn. He reflects:

Internationally, ceramics has played a key role to unlocking human history, helping us to date our growth via fragments of clay. New Zealand’s industrial ceramic history was based upon techniques reflected in sherds (pieces) I found while mudlarking on the Thames. These sherds are examples of processes our ceramic predecessors were influenced by and became the backbone of early New Zealand pottery.

 The works in Living History were built gradually and painstakingly by hand, each taking about one month to complete. Consequently, Stratton’s works absorb his concerns and responsibilities as an artist and stay-at-home father. One of his most abstracted works, Girl from the Mailbox, is based on a clothing model from a Farmers catalogue: part of a commercial world that affects Stratton’s practice just as much as the historical techniques he researches. These realities drew Stratton to modernist movements such as constructivism and brutalism on his residency, which are both reactions to the industrial age. Each calls for artists and architects to understand the limitations and possibilities of the materials they work with, so that their final output is stripped down to its most essential elements.

Connecting these components, Stratton draws links between past and present and the hidden influences that permeate contemporary New Zealand society.

Living History is developed and toured by The Dowse Art Museum with the support of Creative New Zealand.

Call for Applications | Wild Creations

Call for Applications | Wild Creations

Applications due Friday August 24

Creative New Zealand has teamed up with DOC again to help artists get inspiration from nature! Wild Creations offers artists the opportunity to experience DOC environments and / or programmes as inspiration for new work.

Wild Creations offers a minimum of two artists the chance to experience Department of Conservation environments and/or programmes as inspiration for new art work.

For full information and application visit their website

Project timing

  • You must be available to undertake your nominated Wild Creations experience between December 2018 and June 2019.

Benefits and track record

  • Your project or activities must directly benefit New Zealand (NZ) arts, artists or practitioners.
  • You must have a track record of arts experience and success. This means you must have:
    • recognition from peers or experts
    • specialised training or practical experience
    • successfully completed an arts project, outside of a course of study, that received a degree of critical or sales success

Who can apply

  • You must be an individual artist who is a NZ citizen or permanent resident – organisations are not eligible to apply for this fund.
  • Overseas-based NZ artists can apply, but your application must show direct benefits to NZ arts and you must have it endorsed by:
    • a NZ artist(s) resident in NZ and/or;
    • a well-established NZ-based arts organisation(s).

For full information and application visit their website

 

Call for Proposals | NZSoS 2018 Indoor Gallery

Call for Proposals | NZSoS 2018 Indoor Gallery

Proposals due Friday August 31, no later than 5pm

NZ Sculpture OnShore are now inviting submissions for the Indoor Gallery at NZ Sculpture OnShore 2018 is now open. In 2016, the gallery raised tens of thousands of dollars for Women’s refuges and artists around the country.  If you’re an artist working in small sculpture or quality objet d’art, and would like your work to be seen by an arts-focused audience of 20,000 while supporting a good cause, then they would like to hear from you.

All artists interested in proposing an artwork(s) for the Indoor Gallery space in the Officers’ Mess at Fort Takapuna in Auckland are invited to submit a proposal(s) for consideration. It is not a themed exhibition. All concepts will be considered.

Proposals will be received until 5pm on Friday August 31 2018. – however they urge you to register early to secure your space. There is no entry fee.

NZ Sculpture OnShore looks forward to hearing from you.

– Ross Liew and Anna Hanson, Curators, NZ Sculpture OnShore 2018.

NZ Sculpture OnShore is a national biennial event presented at the spectacular Fort Takapuna Historic Reserve on Auckland’s North Shore. The Indoor Gallery is an opportunity for artists to place sculptures and works related to their sculptural practice within an indoor environment focused on sales. For several years the indoor gallery has included both artists who have been selected for the outdoor exhibition and any other artist who submits work of a suitable quality.

The focus in the Indoor Gallery is to provide a very diverse offering of high quality art works of all sizes for interested art collectors and members of the public. NZ Sculpture OnShore aim to include many smaller art works that are priced more modestly; and several artists have provided us with multiples and editions.

NZ Sculpture OnShore welcome submissions of more than one work.

All of the works will be for sale. NZ Sculpture Onshore Ltd will take a commission of 33⅓%, the proceeds of which will directly benefit NZ Women’s Refuges. They are proud to say that, since its inception, more than $1.7 million dollars has been donated for women and families in need across New Zealand.

For more information, please visit their website :www.nzsculptureonshore.co.nz, or contact us at artists@nzsculptureonshore.co.nz

All proposals should be submitted via our online form here: 

 https://form.jotform.co/80842437873869

2018 Exhibition |  November 3 – 18 | Fort Takapuna, Devonport, Auckland |

Enquiries | artists@nzsculptureonshore.co.nz

image: Russell Beck, ‘Autumn Diagonal’, 2014. Photo: Goina Thedinga, aotearoa.co.nz

Nga Tohu o Te Kawerau a Maki | the people, their stories and treasures

Nga Tohu o Te Kawerau a Maki | the people, their stories and treasures

Opening Saturday June 30, from 10am

Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary, Auckland

Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery in Titirangi is pleased to present Nga Tohu o Te Kawerau a Maki – the people, their stories and treasures – an exhibition celebrating the mana whenua of Waitakere and surrounding districts. The exhibition will open at Te Uru in Titirangi on 30 June, following on from the dawn karakia at Arataki Visitor Centre, which launches Matariki Festival 2018.

Nga Tohu o Te Kawerau a Maki marks an ongoing and developing relationship between the gallery and local iwi. Te Uru, a name that refers to the phrase Te Hau a Uru (the wind from the west) was gifted to the gallery by Te Kawerau a Maki. Te Hau a Uru, developed in partnership with Te Kawerau a Maki, was ALSO the first exhibition held in the gallery in November 2014.

Image: Hei Tiki Pounamu from Te Kawerau a Maki Collection

Josephine Cachemaille | FEELS

Josephine Cachemaille | FEELS

Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery, Auckland

Heaped, hanging, climbing and draping, FEELS is an installation by artist Josephine Cachemaille. Working with a range of precious, crafted and familiar objects, FEELScomposes hybrid sculpture/paintings into a lively, suggestive and humorous assemblage.

Here, Cachemaille’s aluminium structures take on anthropomorphic forms which, dressed in materials and appendages, proposes them as ‘bodies’ with needs, desires and the capacity to act. Describing her installations as ‘collaborations,’ she charges them with active, human functions, asking us what these objects might say, think or feel?

By manoeuvring her objects into new and purposeful relationships, Cachemaille intends to disperse our focus of the visual towards an awareness of the body, the senses and the surrounding environment. In this way, she explores the potential of art-making as a kind of relational ontology, prioritising the relationships between things, and challenging dominant ways of knowing objects in their passive physical sense.

The earth looks upon us | Ko Papatūānuku te matua o te tangata

The earth looks upon us | Ko Papatūānuku te matua o te tangata

Opening event Friday July 6, from 6pm

Adam Art Gallery, Wellington

Ngahuia Harrison
Ana Iti
Nova Paul
Raukura Turei

Adam Art Gallery Te Pātaka Toi is pleased to present The earth looks upon us / Ko Papatūānuku te matua o te tangata, our latest exhibition featuring new and existing work by four Māori women artists—Ngahuia Harrison, Ana Iti, Nova Paul, and Raukura Turei—who explore their relation to and cultural connection with whenua/earth/place. Curated by Christina Barton, the exhibition has been scheduled as the Adam Art Gallery’s contribution to the Suffrage 125 celebrations. We acknowledge that, 125 years ago, Māori women fought and won the right to not only vote for members of the New Zealand House of Representatives, but also to vote and stand as members of the Maori Parliament, Te Kotahitanga.

Opening 6pm, Friday 6 July

 

Ngahuia Harrison (Ngātiwai, Ngāpuhi) is a lens-based artist based in Auckland. She completed her MFA at Elam School of Fine Arts in 2012 and currently is completing a practice-led PhD at the University of Auckland examining how Ngātiwai philosophies can be applied to creative practice. She has undertaken solo projects at Enjoy Public Art Gallery, Wellington (2017); St Paul ST, Auckland (2017), and Blue Oyster Art Project Space, Dunedin (2016).

Ana Iti (Te Rawara) is based in Wellington where she is completing her Master of Fine Arts at Massey University. Since receiving her BFA in Sculpture at Ilam School of Fine Arts at the University of Canterbury in 2012, she has developed a body of work that explores sites and histories using found materials, texts and video to – as she puts it – ‘open space for more subjective experiences and feelings’. She has undertaken residencies in Adelaide and Dunedin and has exhibited her works nationally in artist-run and project spaces, including Window, University of Auckland (2018); Scape Public Art, Christchurch (2017); The Engine Room, Wellington (2017); The Physics Room, Christchurch (2016); North Projects, Christchurch (2016); and Blue Oyster Art Project Space, Dunedin (2016).

Nova Paul (Te Uriroroi/Te Parawhau, Ngā Puhi) is an artist film-maker who lives in Tāmaki Makaurau Auckland and teaches in the School of Art and Design at AUT. Her film-making practice draws from early cinema, experimental film histories and fourth wave film discourse to consider the poetics and politics of place. Her work has been screened at film festivals and in exhibitions in Aotearoa, Australia, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, UK, and USA. Paul also writes about lens-based media. She co-edited PLACE: Local Knowledge and New Media Practice (2008) and a book based on her film, This is Not Dying, titled Form Next to Form Next to Form was published in 2013.

Raukura Turei (Ngāi Tai ki Tāmaki and Ngā Rauru Kītahi) is an artist, architect, and actor. She graduated from the University of Auckland with a Master of Architecture in 2011 and has worked collaboratively on architectural projects such as Whare in the Bush, Warkworth (2014) and He Whare Tangata, Auckland (2013). She has also undertaken art/design projects, The Grief Series, Miss Crabb HQ, Auckland (2017) and Untitled (pending welcome), Objectspace, Auckland (2017). She presented a suite of drawings, Te poho o Hine-Ruhi, as a Project for the Auckland Art Fair (2018), and her SELFseries was shown at Allpress Studio in Auckland (2017).

 

Highlights of the public programme associated with this exhibition include the one-day symposium on Saturday 7 July: No Common Ground. This symposium addresses histories of feminist art, mana wahine and queer practice. Hosted at Victoria University of Wellington, it is co-organised with The Dowse Art Museum and Enjoy Public Art Gallery.

Adam Art Gallery is also hosting a one-night screening on Wednesday 18 July of eight films by the Cuban/American artist, Ana Mendieta, who has in part inspired this exhibition. This is introduced by Gabriela Salgado, an expert on Mendieta and artists of the ‘global south’ who is currently Artistic Director at Te Tuhi in Auckland. This is the first screening of Mendieta’s works in Aotearoa New Zealand. The event is brought to Wellington with assistance from the Estate of Ana Mendieta Collection and Galerie Lelong, New York.

For the full public programme click here.

Gordon Walters | New Vision

Gordon Walters | New Vision

Opening Saturday July 7

Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, Auckland

Gordon Walters is one of New Zealand’s most important modernist painters. Across six decades he explored the potential of a few simple geometric elements with a singular focus, creating works of exactitude and refinement.

Gordon Walters: New Vision is the first comprehensive survey of the artist’s complete body of work and draws on paintings from major public and private collections across New Zealand. The exhibition provides an in-depth look into the history of Walters’ development, and reveals the different art forms which fuelled his vision and inspired the creation of his own unique visual language. The original black and white koru paintings of the 1960s are brought back together for the first time and are shown alongside never-before-seen paintings, studies and notebooks.

Gordon Walters: New Vision is a partnership project between the Dunedin Public Art Gallery and Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki with support from the Walters Estate.

Gallery entry is free for New Zealand residents, children 12 and under and Gallery Members. An admission charge applies for international visitors.

Image: Gordon Walters, Tiki II 1966
Barry Hopkins Trust Art Collection
Courtesy Waikato Museum Te Whare Taonga o Waikato and the Walters Estate

Call for Entries | Jann Medlicott Creative Arts Award

Call for Entries | Jann Medlicott Creative Arts Award

Applications close Friday August 31, at 5pm

Acorn Foundation & Creative Bay of Plenty 

Prize Objective

An annual award valued at $2,000 is for furtherance of studies in the creative arts. This award shall be known as the Acorn Foundation: Jann Medlicott Creative Arts Award.

Criteria

  • Applicants must be undertaking or about to commence further study in preparation for a career in creative arts.
  • Applicants must provide evidence that they are engaged in, or have been accepted for, an advanced study programme or specialised course in the arts.
  • Applications must be received by 5pm, 31 August 2018.
  • Applicants must have:
  • Received at least part of their secondary education in Tauranga or Western Bay of Plenty
  • and/or currently reside in the Tauranga or Western Bay of Plenty

Requirements

  • A personal statement summarising your experience, ability and reasons for applying, and outlining the impact this award is likely to have on your training and how this could benefit the local community in the future.
  • Two testimonials from appropriate referees.
  • A brief portfolio of your work if this is relevant to the application.

Application form

Applications can be sent to hello@creativebop.org.anz

Further information can be found here: www.creativebop.org.nz/funding/jann-medlicott-award

John Vea | Two Recent Works

John Vea | Two Recent Works

Opening Saturday July 14

Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin

John Vea is a contemporary artist based in Auckland.  Working across video, performance and sculpture, Vea makes visible stories of Pacific migration, labour and the lived experiences of minority cultures who he has consulted with as part of his research methodology.   Presenting two recent video works by Vea, this exhibition introduces the work of an artist committed to highlighting stories all too often absent from mainstream conversations.

Open Call | Depot Gallery

Open Call | Depot Gallery

Applications close Friday September 28, at 5pm

Depot Artspace, Auckland

Calling artists and creatives interested in exhibiting at Depot Gallery or who wish to run an event in 2019.

What they’re looking for:

  • Exhibitions and Events that build community and create opportunities for individuals to work together, increasing individual wellbeing, environmental and social justice.
  •  Exhibitions and Events that encourage courageous leadership where artists question, take a stand, and tackle meaningful social and environmental issues.
  • Exhibitions and Events that deepen our understanding of Te Ao Māori and celebrate Aotearoa New Zealand’s unique and evolving identity.
  • Exhibitions and Events that are inclusive, people-focused, fair and welcoming to everyone, creating experiences that make a difference.
  •  Exhibitions and Events that stimulate creative innovation, cutting edge art that challenges audiences, and invites interactive and engaging participation.

For more information/to submit your proposal visit: http://www.depotartspace.co.nz/exhibit-here/

 

 

Student Series 2018 | Multiple Exhibtions

Student Series 2018 | Multiple Exhibtions

Ilam Campus Gallery, Block 2, SoFA, Christchurch 

The Winter Garden
Tuesday July 24 – Thursday August 9

(Performances on Tuesdays & Thursdays from 5.00pm to 7.00pm)
Artists: Priscilla Howe, Liam Krijgsman, Charlotte Peters, Alice Bray
The Winter Garden is a multi-media re-presentation of a building that sat at the site of 195-199 Armagh Street and the activities that took place inside over its lifespan. The Winter Garden functioned as a social venue from 1927 through until 1984, often catering to debutante balls, fashion shows, formal dinners and other celebrations. In 1984 the ownership of the building changed hands, and after some time in limbo a part of the building was repurposed as a music venue, the other half demolished, becoming the site of the Trade Union Centre. In the undertaking of this project, the work will address the reproduction of a space we have limited memory or understanding of, creating an anachronistic reimagining of this social and cultural bastion.

Fuzzy Match
Opening event Tuesday August 14, from 5.00pm, exhibition closes Thursday August 30
Artists: Giselle Fortune, Hannah Phillips
Fuzzy Match is an experiment in collaboration in which Hannah and Giselle negotiate commonalities between their individual art practices while observing processes inherent in their own collaboration. They attempt to lay bare their experience and to acknowledge its nuances: the uncertainties, the fuzzy translation of ideas between different forms and between two people, the gaps, the misunderstandings and the successes.

Best Located
Monday July 16 – Friday July 27
Artists: Jamie Teheuheu, Connie Dwyer, Theresa Gimblett, Brandon Clark, Richard Elderton, Min-Young Her, Christian Lamont, Tessa McPhee, Ollie Thompson, Natasha Wilson
Best Located is a satellite exhibition of the 2018 Student Series prompting changes in the perception of Fine Arts in the University of Canterbury (UC) through appropriation of communication vessels and advertising devices.

Image credit (far right section): Chris Andrews, thebigcity.co.nz (detail)

Group Show | Give Me Space

Group Show | Give Me Space

Opening event Thursday July 19, from 6pm

Corban Estate Arts Centre, Auckland

Antje Barke, Patricia Ramos, Hanna Shim and Arielle Walker

Give me space explores ways to articulate and emphasise the physical area of the gallery spaces at Corban Estate Arts Centre. Using a broad range of materials, from the natural to the man-made, this exhibition includes wool, silk, steel, concrete, photography, textiles and more. The site-specific pieces ask the audience to consider their own footprints in relation to the architecture, shape and design and history of the Homestead space.

Image: Patricia Ramos If it were my bahay kubo what do I see around me. 2018. Photograph.

Quishile Charan | Like a Lotus Flower that Grew from Mud

Quishile Charan | Like a Lotus Flower that Grew from Mud

Opening event Thursday July 19, from 6pm

Corban Estate Arts Centre, Auckland

Through textile production techniques passed down from Quishile Charan’s aaji (grandmother), the artist recontextualises the role of the female Girmityas, bringing to light the significance of their roles and the indentured labour they endured. Using repetition of archival images, Charan subverts the “record of power” to form connections with these women, creating a textile narrative of celebratory love.

Liyen Chong | She watched her wings fly, her mouth shut, her feet run

Liyen Chong | She watched her wings fly, her mouth shut, her feet run

Opening event Monday July 30, from 6.00pm

Pah Homestead, TSB Bank Wallace Arts Centre, Auckland 

This exhibition presents a selection of works from 2011; during the period Liyen Chong was artist in residence at the McCahon House Artists’ Residency in French Bay Auckland (Feb-May 2011). Included are bowls produced prior to the residency, with light boxes and mixed media prints completed soon after. The imagery is drawn from a series of shoots and performances in which Chong was both sole photographer and subject. She appears in these works within the small confines of a studio space in various poses and attire. The images were altered further in the process, with the addition of various marks and patterns on the surface. Further representations of selfhood appear in Chong’s ceramic bowls and plates. Photographic prints of her hair or of herself in silhouette are fired in to the centre of the vessels, forming swirling black patterns. These dishes have been displayed as installations on the floor so that that the different circles and designs are emphasised further.

The ‘selfie’ is now wide reaching across the Internet and society – many follow on from the urge to show that ‘I was there’ and say, ‘I did this’ or ‘I am this’. Liyen Chong could be misconstrued as being in on the same act. However, her performances in front of camera for this series were more intuitive and non-deliberate. Inspiration for Chong derived from different sources – key is the Jewish-French artist Claude Cahun (1894 -1954). Cahun is well known for her self-portraits, photographs which animated a variety of personae and identifiers. In a similar sense here, Chong is presenting multiple selves from multiple points of view, from the most intimate and to the most public.

Image: Liyen Chong, Untitled (2011).

Evan Woodruffe | the world is porous

Evan Woodruffe | the world is porous

Opening event Saturday Jul 28, from 10.30am

Tauranga Art Gallery, Bay of Plenty 

Contemporary Auckland-based artist, Evan Woodruffe, has transformed the Tauranga Art Gallery atrium with layers of dramatic velvet silk and vibrant canvas works in his solo exhibition, the world is porous.

Image: Evan Woodruffe, 8th June 2018 (detail), 2018.

 

Fiona Pardington | Midnight at the Crossroads

Fiona Pardington | Midnight at the Crossroads

Opening event Saturday July 28, from 4pm

The Vivian, Matakana 

The Vivian are delighted to launch Fiona Pardington’s outstanding new series, Midnight at the Crossroads in collaboration with Starkwhite.

Recognised as one of New Zealand’s leading artists, and with over 30-years of professional practice, Fiona believes photography is the ultimate animistic portal; a crossroad where mundane and etheric meet in light and shadow.

Image: Fiona Pardington, Suspect Device 2017.
Courtesy of the artist and Starkwhite, New Zealand

Group Show | Iconography of Revolt

Group Show | Iconography of Revolt

City Gallery, Wellington

This show considers the ways artists, filmmakers, and designers have explored and contributed to the iconography of revolt.

It excavates history, from Varvara Stepanova’s Bolshevik sportswear from the 1920s to Emory Douglas’s Black Panther newspaper graphics from the late 1960s and 1970s. It also features Belgian artist Johan Grimonprez’s harrowing collage documentary, Dial H-I-S-T-O-R-Y(1997), which explores the romantic heyday of airplane-hijacking revolutionaries through the eyes of the media.

Australian artist Marco Fusinato creates industrial enlargements of news photos of the decisive moment in riots, when a protagonist brandishes a rock against a backdrop of fire. He also invites well-known graphic designers to remake a historic protest banner in their own distinct styles.

Dress code is crucial. Los Angeles-based artist Jemima Wyman explores the rhetoric of camouflage and masks, via the Zapatistas and Anonymous. In their trademark balaclavas, Russian punk band Pussy Riot are whipped by Cossack militia at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics for singing ‘Putin will teach you how to love the motherland’. Plus, there’s a promotional video for the London fashion label Maharishi’s ‘Viet-Afghan Coalition’ collection.

Also featured: Jean-Luc Godard, Giovanni Intra and Michael Parekōwhai, Oliver Maxwell, Dane Mitchell, Muslimgauze, Michael Stevenson, and Rosemarie Trockel.

Image: Jemima Wyman Combat Drag: Lessons in Unlimited Expansion 2008

The Review | Group Show

The Review | Group Show

Milford Galleries, Queenstown 

Artists: Andy Leleisi’uao, Galia Amsel, Israel Birch, Chris Charteris, Mike Crawford, Neil Dawson, John Edgar, Brett Graham, Michael Hight, Robert Jahnke, Yukari Kaihori, Karl Maughan, Mark Mitchell, J S Parker, Peter James Smith, Terry Stringer and Harry Watson.

Image: Andy Leleisi’uao, Undertone People of Angipani, 2016

Opportunity | Young Artist Award

Opportunity | Young Artist Award

Accepting entries: Thursday August 30, from 5.00pm to 7.00pm and Friday August 31, from 12.00pm – 4.00pm at the Mt Eden Village Centre.

The Young Artists Awards are held in August/September each year and are open to artists between the ages of 16 and 25 who live or attend school within the wider Mt Eden area.

Culminating in an exhibition of work and judged by well known artists, the awards comprise of generous cash and other grants to further the winners’ art careers. The aim of the Young Artists Awards is to provide a platform for young artists to exhibit their work, to place it in a professional gallery environment and to encourage adventurous experimentation and creativity. Eden Arts has been supporting young artists in this way for 30 years.

For eligibility and more information click here. 

Image: Shoal Makata, Trampoline (previous recipient) 

Whitney Bedford | Bohemia

Whitney Bedford | Bohemia

Opening event, Tuesday July 31, from 5.30pm

Starkwhite, Auckland 

American painter Whitney Bedford creates portraits and landscapes with emotional charge as to embolden her archetypal subjects with memory and paint. Bedford uses iconic public figures and the popular mythology of recent academia to create a personal encyclopedia of references. The metaphors and visual symbols in her practice form a rich and potent landscape from which to map current history and contemporary romanticism

Bedford has titled her exhibition Bohemia, seeing the paintings as “a fantasy arcadia compared to our dark and conservative times.” There’s a sense of the mythical to these paintings, their strange beauty offering an idealised place or age, somewhere to escape and rediscover what’s essential.

She also turns her attention to a particularly New Zealand visual history as a muse for these bohemian dreams – two of our pioneering women. Women’s Suffrage leader Kate Sheppard, who heralded the first ever female vote and stands as an icon for women’s rights across the world, joins pioneering and record-breaking aviator Jean Batten in having her portrait painted by Bedford. In this year marking the 125th anniversary of Women’s Suffrage in New Zealand, both symbolise the ingenuity of women’s courage, and the fight for equality, and stand as a votive for what is possible. “Both the landscapes and the portraits in Bohemia act as bright lights in a backwards future: to remember battles fought, places lost, and women determined to inspire courage ahead” media and contemporary life, Bohemia offers refuge.

Image: Whitney Bedford, Pink and White Terraces, 2018

2019 Blue Oyster Art Project Space and Caselberg Trust Summer Residency

2019 Blue Oyster Art Project Space and Caselberg Trust Summer Residency

Application deadline Friday August 31

Blue Oyster Summer Residency is proudly presented alongside the Caselberg Trust with the intention of providing space, facilities and support for the successful applicant to develop their research and practice. The successful applicant will be provided with a modest fee to assist with production, material and transport, accomodation and the use of Charles Brasch Studio for January 2019 (exact dates to be confirmed).

The outcome of the 2019 Summer Residency will be established in communication with the Director and Trust and it is expected an exhibition will be developed in the months following the completion of the residency.

For application requirements and how to submit click here.

Image: Motoko Kikkawa, Shortsighted Girl’s Very Thick Wall, 2017. Summer Residency recipient 2017.

Call For Entries | ECC NZ Student Craft Design Awards

Call For Entries | ECC NZ Student Craft Design Awards

Entries close Sunday September 30, at Midnight

Since 1986 The Friends of The Dowse have offered their support to New Zealand tertiary students through an Award scheme designed to encourage innovation and creativity specifically in the areas of design and craft. It is the leading national award in this area.

Entries are welcome in the fields of lighting, furniture and product design, jewellery, and fashion and textiles. This is the only national award in New Zealand that celebrates creative students studying across multiple creative disciplines and from various levels of study including undergraduate and postgraduate programmes.

Eligibility:
 The Awards are open to full or part-time students enrolled at a New Zealand* tertiary institution during 2018, or who completed the final year of their course in 2017. Students must be enrolled, or completed a course in 2017, in a Lighting / Furniture / Product Design / Glass / Ceramics / Textile / Fashion or Jewellery related course (or similar) to be eligible.

For further information and how to apply click here.

Chris Ingham | Figures in Urban Landscape

Chris Ingham | Figures in Urban Landscape

Solander Gallery, Wellington

Melbourne based artist Chris Ingham is exhibiting a suite of new etchings, lithographs and bronzes that explore the theme of the individual in the wider community. Notions of private and public, the known and the anonymous are reflected in Chris’s urban landscapes.

 

Creative Connections Residency | Caselberg Trust

Creative Connections Residency | Caselberg Trust

Application deadline, Friday August 31

Residency Information:

  • Duration is 3 months, to be taken during any 3 month period within the 12 month period of offer.
  • Accommodation is located at Caselberg House, Broad Bay, Dunedin. Residents are required to stay at the house and work from the Charles Brasch Studio.
  • A Stipend of NZ$6000 is awarded to the resident
  • A further NZ$2000 available for project/material costs.
  • This residency is open to New Zealand residents only.

Applications are required to be sent as one PDF to info@caselbergtrust.org

For further information and application forms please visit: https://www.caselbergtrust.org/residencies/

Image: Raewyn Martyn, biofilm still 6, 2018. Previous participant a Caselburg Trust Residency.

Crudo Or Periless Might | Owen Connors

Crudo Or Periless Might | Owen Connors

Opening event Wednesday August 1, from 5.30pm

MEANWHILE, Wellington

Taking cues from the AIDS Memorial Quilts and queer barebacking fetish communities, CRUDO OR PERILESS MIGHT explores the impact of recent medical developments in treatment and prevention on the bodies, languages and sexual imaging of those living with HIV.

With spectral and fractured poems stitched to textiles to produce fleshy and optically elusive quilts, this exhibition reimagines queer modes of making and expressions of mourning to reclaim the ‘positive’ body and its transcendence through survival. The works take linguistic cues from the poetic logics of pharmaceutical nomenclature, drawing upon the techniques deployed by pharmaceutical branding consultancy Ixxéo – sound association, melodic contrast, verbal velocity, the mixing of ‘morphological elements derived from roots and word patterns across languages’ – to compose incantations which are at times lucid, at others unyielding. These works give form to alternative modes of meaning making attuned to the realities of a compromised immune system – playing upon the ways HIV produces non-normative communicative patterns at a cellular level.

Presented alongside these quilts are a series of painting that explore further the codified languages particular to queer history and experience. Freshly tattooed biohazard symbols and venomous insects decorate badly lit fragments of bodies, juxtaposing these poetic quilts with missives marked on bodies to explore how the invisible is made material.

In association with the exhibition, MEANWHILE will be hosting a visit to the New Zealand AIDS Memorial Quilt held by Te Papa at 2 pm on Friday 3rd August. Please RSVP via email to hello@meanwhile.gallery.

Image courtesy of MEANWHILE

Karin Barr & Graeme Hitchcock | Eclectic II

Karin Barr & Graeme Hitchcock | Eclectic II

Opening event Wednesday July 1, from 5.30pm

Form Gallery, Christchurch 

Karin Barr and Graeme Hitchcock first met while attending a glass casting course at Art Station in Auckland in 2009, and have attended a number of Masterclass workshops to further their ability to express what they wish to say. They are displaying their works together in an exhibition at Form Gallery throughout August, where they will both be introducing new artworks and in attendance for the opening evening.

Image: Graeme Hitchcock, Out of Sight VI

Kelvin Mann | Skein

Kelvin Mann | Skein

Solander Gallery, Wellington

Skein refers to a flock of wild geese or swans in flight, typically in a V-shaped formation. They fly in this manner in order to benefit from the preceding bird’s updraft to save energy during a long flight.

As with triangular shape of migratory birds, the triangle can also reflect the genealogical base of a species. During the 1970’s and 80’s conservationist Don Merton lead a team to save a tiny bird, the Black Robin, whose numbers at one point dropped to only five. There were two adult females and of that pair only one, Old Blue, managed to successfully rear chicks. Today there are an estimated 250 black robins, all descended from Old Blue who sits unequivocally at the top of her triangular family tree.

This suite of works reflects the significance of the individual and their integral connection to the flock, like building blocks or jigsaw pieces for something larger and far more important.

New Zealand born Kelvin has worked as a printmaker at Stoney Road Press in Dublin since 2002 and shows in Ireland, the United Kingdom, New Zealand and Australia.

Image: Kelvin Mann, Old Blue’s family tree, 2018

Matariki 2019 Call for Proposals | Toi Pōneke Gallery

Matariki 2019 Call for Proposals | Toi Pōneke Gallery

Applications close Friday August 31

Toi Pōneke Gallery, Wellington

Toi Pōneke Gallery is calling for proposals with a Māori kaupapa from Wellington curators and artists for an exhibition at Toi Pōneke Gallery during the Matariki festival in 2019. The exhibition will open in late June and run through to mid-July.

For guidelines and further information click here.

Image: Mata Aho Collective Kao Kao 2014

Deformed Secretions | Hannah Salmon & Sam Ovens

Deformed Secretions | Hannah Salmon & Sam Ovens

Opening event Thursday August 2, from 5.30pm

Audio Foundation, Auckland 

Hannah Salmon is a Wellington-based artist, illustrator, musician and DIY publisher, whose art practice takes the form of an ongoing political art project entitled Daily Secretion.

Sam Ovens is a Dunedin, New Zealand based artist, musician and screen-printer. An avid collector of recorded media, Ovens adopts the moniker ‘Deformed’ on certain occasions, eg. DJ-ing, performing.

Image: Courtesy of The Audio Foundation

 

Denys Watkins | Dynamo Hum

Denys Watkins | Dynamo Hum

Opening event Friday August 3, from 5.30pm

CoCA Toi Moroki Centre of Contemporary Art, Christchurch 

Dynamo Hum features a selection of key paintings by Denys Watkins – one of New Zealand’s outstanding visual artists. The exhibition is the first travelling survey of recent works by Watkins, a practicising artist for nearly fifty years, whose work is featured in public and private collections around the country.

 

The CHCH/Ōtautahi Zine Library |

The CHCH/Ōtautahi Zine Library |

Opening event Friday August 3, from 5.30pm

CoCA Toi Moroki Centre of Contemporary Art, Christchurch 

It was born from the love of supporting artists and zine makers at our annual Christchurch Zinefest, and Zinefests around the country. In creating an accessible collection, we aim to provide a platform for anyone to showcase their Zines in an easy-going and informal environment, whilst keeping a detailed catalogue online for archival purposes. Zines are incredibly important, and a collection dedicated to promoting DIY culture and self publishing is crucial in any city, and especially cities that have faced hardships, are battling with diversity issues or are struggling with gentrification and keeping subcultures alive.

 

Thomas Hancock & Jane Shriffer | Duo Show

Thomas Hancock & Jane Shriffer | Duo Show

Opening event Friday August 3, from 5.00pm

Gallery Thirty Three, Wanaka

Thomas Hancock’s ‘Objection’ and Jane Shriffer’s ‘Don’t Touch That’ – A colourful and rich exhibition with a fun contrast of figurative and abstract painting.

Image: Thomas Hancock, Cosh Ompruv.

Len Lye | Heaven and Earth

Len Lye | Heaven and Earth

Opening event Saturday August 4, from 6.00pm

Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth

Although well-known for the thrilling and sublime engineering of his kinetic sculpture, Lye’s passion for movement – across a variety of media that included film and painting too – went hand in hand with the seductive energies of the natural world.

This exhibition explores the environments that inspired Lye’s sense of wonder, from the crashing waves of his New Zealand childhood to the marvels of the heavens, both the scientific and mythic.

Image: Len Lye Moon Bead 1968. Photo Bryan James.

Sensory Agents | Group Exhibtion

Sensory Agents | Group Exhibtion

Opening event Saturday August 4, from 6.00pm

Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth

Work by Len Lye alongside installations and new commissions by Yuko Mohri (JP), Sergei Tcherepnin (US) and Danae Valenza (AU), three international artists working across sculpture, sound and musical composition.

Centred around Len Lye’s noise-making kinetic sculpture and a set of audio recordings held in the Len Lye Foundation Archive, Sensory Agentsfocuses on the role sound plays in Lye’s work, and links Lye to a younger generation of artists who share his interest in the capacity of sound and music to elicit sensory responses.

Image: Len Lye,  Grass 1961-1965. Len Lye Foundation Collection, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery.

(Un)conditional IV | Group Exhibtion

(Un)conditional IV | Group Exhibtion

Opening event Sunday August 5, from 2.00pm

Ashburton Art Gallery, Christchurch 

This exhibition is a partnership between The Ashburton Art Gallery and The Physics Room, Christchurch.

In March, collection items from the Ashburton Art Gallery collection were exhibited alongside work created by Eve Armstrong, John Vea, and Mike Hewson in (Un)conditional I at The Physics Room in Christchurch. Now, in August, Armstrong, Vea, and Hewson have made new work responding to the (Un)conditional series of exhibitions, which explores the concepts of hosting, being a guest, trade, exchange, reciprocity, utu, and manaakitanga, as well as Ashburton as a particular site.

Further information on this show here.

Free Return Bus to the Opening:
Bus leaves Worcester Boulevard (outside TPR) at 12.30pm Sunday 5 August to arrive at Ashburton Art Gallery for 2.00pm opening. Bus leaves Ashburton Art Gallery at 5.00pm to return to Worcester Boulevard.

There are 35 seats available
Please contact Hope Wilson, Assistant Curator: hope@physicsroom.org.nz for reservations

Public programming:
Sunday 5 August, 2pm: Join the artists and curator of the exhibition (Un)conditional IV for the opening at Ashburton Art Gallery. We may travel off-site to visit works installed across Ashburton.

Saturday 4 August: 12-4pm & Sunday 5 August: 11am-4pm
Eve Armstrong will present her ongoing project Trading Table. Trading Table involves the artist setting up a table in a public place and inviting people to trade with her for something on the table. Trading Table deals in multiple currencies including ideas, information, skills, services and items. Most participants encounter the table unexpectedly and work with the artist and her assistants to devise a trade on the spot. These trades are simply written on fluorescent card and displayed on the table.

Image: Design by Blue Monday Collective.

Stella Brennan | Object Permanence

Stella Brennan | Object Permanence

Opening event Sunday August 5, from 4.00pm

Trish Clark Gallery, Auckland 

In Brennan’s new body of work she interrogates permanence, both of objects and the energies arising from nuclear radiation, and how the time scales involved must invoke fresh human thinking. Two new video works accompany intricate textile works, marrying domestic ordinariness with complex social and scientific considerations.

Image: Stella Brennan, video still from Object Permanence, 2018

Blue and White | Group Show

Blue and White | Group Show

Northart, Auckland

Artists: Alvin Xiong, Wei Lun Ha, Gavin Chai.
For over a thousand years, porcelain was one of the most universally admired and widely imitated products in the world. Since its invention in the seventh century, it has been a prime vehicle for the assimilation and transmission of culture, artistic symbols, themes, and designs across vast distances. “Blue and white” is one of the classic decorative approaches for Chinese porcelain, being recognised all over the world as a symbol of Chinese culture.

This exhibition shines a light on New Zealand-Chinese artists Wei Lun Ha, Gavin Chai and Alvin Xiong across the wide discipline of paintings, drawings, photography and lightworks. From their lineage of Chinese ancestry and culture, each came to New Zealand at a certain age from three different countries. They not only have a different background, but also hold dissimilar perspectives about contemporary art and transcultural communication. Beyond the knowledge of traditional Chinese aesthetics, their visions on “blue and white” reflect the diversity of values and philosophies in contemporary Chinese a

An artists’ talk will be held at 2pm Sunday 19th August in Gallery 4-5.

Image courtesy of Northart

Blue Oyster Art Project Space | Call for Proposals

Blue Oyster Art Project Space | Call for Proposals

Application deadline Friday August 31

Blue Oyster invites inquisitive proposals that are new, innovative and free from commercial nature by solo, duo or collaborating artists and curators. Blue Oyster Arts Trust and the Director will prioritise proposals of a high-quality that focus on the development of experimental artistic practice and relate, add to and strengthen the diverse perspectives on local, national and global conversations.

The Trust aims to present original exhibitions that responds and works in harmony with the Blue Oyster space, locale and history. To read and understand more about the Trust’s mission and goals visit About Page online.

Your Application Must Include:

  • 500 word written outline of your proposed project and how it fits into your current practice. Outlines that are self-aware, critical, well-researched and clearly written will be prioritised.
  • 4-5 Examples of your previous work, written, photographic, audio and video documentation encouraged in links to websites.
  • 1 page artist CV with bio that explains your professional background and experience.
  • You are not required to send illustrated floor plans, please use the floor plans, sketch up file and equipment list  linked below to write and inform your proposal.

For proposal guidelines, and further information for applicants please follow the link below:
http://www.blueoyster.org.nz/proposals/

Marie Shannon |  Rooms found only in the home

Marie Shannon | Rooms found only in the home

Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, Christchurch 

Rooms found only in the home consists of more than 30 years of wryly humorous works, including 40 photographs and five video pieces, by Auckland-based artist Marie Shannon.

Shannon frames the home as a space for making art. Her daily routine and experience as an artist, partner, friend and mother results in an art of immediacy, intimacy and wit.

Image: Marie Shannon New Zealand’s Funniest Art Video 1994.

Power Jacket | Group Show

Power Jacket | Group Show

Opening event Monday August 6, from 6.00pm

Lake House Arts Centre, Auckland 

35 Artists, 35 Jackets, 35 Powerful Statements.

Power jacket is a group exhibition showcasing 35 female creatives from a mix of backgrounds. They will each customise a statement jacket to commemorate the 125th anniversary of women’s suffrage.

Lake House Arts Centre are proud to share that 50% it’s profits from this exhibition will be donated to Women’s Refuge New Zealand.

Returning Home | Jermaine Dean & Pati Tyrell

Returning Home | Jermaine Dean & Pati Tyrell

Opening event Monday August 6, from 5.00pm

Ramp Gallery, Hamilton

Pati Tyrell and Jermaine Dean present a collaborative exhibition Returning Home at Ramp Gallery.  This collection of images re-tell the story of being young, queer and brown in Aotearoa.

Returning Home also does just what it states.  Pati and Jermaine both grew up in Hamilton but left for the big city of Auckland.  It was there that they built their own communities and found their artistic voices.  As founding members and principal photographers of FAFSWAG artist collective and Auckland’s Vogue scene – Pati and Jermaine are now known for their slick and stylised images that capture the queer pacific and indigenous communities they are part of.  Their collective and individual works are being sought after and recognised by collectors and institutions (Pati’s recent exhibition Fāgogo is currently a finalist in the prestigious Walters Prize).

But beyond the slick nature of the images, and any sense of affirmation the art world may want to bestow, these images hold real power.  The power of the stories they tell.  Rather than being voyeuristic, by turning their lenses on themselves and their own community, Pati and Jermaine’s subjects become willing collaborators, telling their own stories.  That’s real power.  The power to be seen.  The power to be heard.

Artist talk: Tuesday August 7, at 11.00am. Events Room 1, The Hub, Wintec

Workshop: Vogue Femme workshop, Thursday August 9, at 3.00pm, R Block, Wintec (meet at Ramp Gallery)

Journeys | Group Show

Journeys | Group Show

Opening event Tuesday August 7, from 5.30pm

Orexart, Auckland 

The artists: Josua Toganvalu, Richard McWhannell, Tony Lane, Peter James Smith, Kathy Barber, Glen Wolfgramm, Wes Fieldhouse, Joon-Hee Park and Philippa Blair.

Journeys can be pilgrimages, tourist trips, bus tours, weekend excursions, but they can also be discoveries of the heart, mind, of literary, artistic, scientific, or spiritual pursuit.

We can travel miles, seeking new visual stimulations, or stay in one place contemplating nothing so much as a few words, or numbers on a screen, or a single brush mark that has the potential to convey meaning far beyond what it ever started out doing. Such are the journeys we take as viewers, visitors, practitioners or mere dreamers. Perhaps in the end, the journey is the thing, however short, however long, it’s the arrivals, the departures, and the glorious bits in between.

Image: Joon-Hee Park, Bath Time Journey, 2009.

Judy Millar | Studies in Place

Judy Millar | Studies in Place

Opening event Tuesday August 7, from 5.00pm

Gow Langsford Gallery, Auckland 

Often working on a large scale, Judy Millar’s latest exhibition Studies in Place provides an intimate viewing of works that are typically unseen outside of her studio; her smaller works on paper. Referenced as ‘studies’, these works showcase Millar’s painterly thought process as she begins to flesh out ideas that may later be conceived on canvas. Unintentionally, these studies become complete works in themselves and have been critical to her practice since 1987, when Millar first moved to the extreme environment that is Auckland’s West Coast. These small paintings have become a means to understand and negotiate the unique and ever-changing landscape she has been surrounded by. Alongside the recent studies, unseen works on paper from 1989 unearth early ideas that have resurfaced and now inform her current practice.

Image courtesy of Gow Langsford Gallery

Not Standing Still | Group Show

Not Standing Still | Group Show

Opening event Tuesday August 7, from 5.30pm

Blue Oyster Art Project Space, Dunedin 

Curated by Raewyn Martyn.
Artists: Katie Breckon, Dana Carter, Scott Flanagan, Jenny Gillam, Hope Ginsburg, Eugene Hansen, Motoko Kikkawa, Geoff Martyn, Melissa Martyn, Raewyn Martyn, William Henry Meung, Murdabike, Anet Neutze, Aroha Novak, Maria O’Toole, Charlotte Parallel, Kim Pieters, Deano Shirriffs and Jemma Woolmore.

Energy sustains live order through a kind of agitation, a little faster and a little hotter. Lack or loss of new energy leads to breakdown of order; perhaps into a collapse, or static equilibrium.

Biophilia means love of living systems. Artists have long used artworks as testing space for new and idiosyncratic systems, systems that do not stand still. Systems that confront reality, systems that emerge in daily life and look toward the future. Our understanding of what is ‘living’ has expanded through appreciation of interrelations within geological and biological systems. Not standing still brings together artists and works that involve visual and embodied systems, along with phenomena of changing conditions.

This exhibition is accompanied by a new online publication designed by Katie Kerr with new writing by Gregory Kan, Raewyn Martyn and Rachel O’Neill which will be launched concurrently via our website.

Artists Talk: Wednesday 8 August, 12pm noon.
Free to attend, all welcome.
Tea and coffee provided, BYO lunch.

Image: 2018 Poster Series by Erin Broughton developed in conversation and using imagery supplied by Jemma Woolmore.

Telly Tuita | TongPopUa

Telly Tuita | TongPopUa

Opening event Tuesday August 7, from 5.00pm

Weasel Gallery, Hamilton 

Born in Tonga, raised in Sydney, and now residing in Wellington, Telly Tuita’s exhibition, TongPopUa, is a solo show which navigates location, connection and cultural identity. Tuita explains the concept of TongPopUa as “… a place, a myth, a fact, a person, a god, an environment, a desire and a conflict. It’s the past in the present.”

TongPopUa is a multimedia exhibition which consists of paintings atop photographic works, cotton paper and recycled brown paper bags. Both framed and simply on paper, these works span a significant size range (from less than 0.5m2 up to 2.5m2). Using a striking palette applied in layers with varying degrees of opacity, Tuita builds complex works comprised of symbolic shapes and patterns. Selected forms are then manipulated to give a sense of depth and movement within the work, creating a bold and engaging exhibition. Using this visual language, Tuita conveys a public account of his personal journey between places, over time.

Cait Johnson | Worth Every Minute

Cait Johnson | Worth Every Minute

Opening event Wednesday August 8, from 5.00pm

Studio One Toi Tu, Studio Space and Side Walk Gallery, Auckland

Dreamer: The girl is in the pool, playing with black snakes that muddy the water. She laughs as they lap around her, slink up her arms. We are in a suburban back garden, wearing swimsuits in pools made of rocks, constructed to look like those that follow waterfalls or line the seafront. There are all kinds of snakes here, we sit in the water with them as if they could not kill. A rope of mandarin and acid yellow curls before us. The more poisonous to the body, the less distinct to the eye: if it weren’t for their neat red stripes, the glass threads turning above our thighs would be imperceptible.

Max Weber: The capitalistic economy of the present day is an immense cosmos into which the individual is born, and which presents itself to them as an unalterable order of things in which they must live.

Framed as a conversation between Cait Johnson’s research and a collection of characters, worth every minute enquires into the bodily, emotional and temporal experience of life in the work society. Marxist-feminist theory, personal observations and dreams are integrated into a pair of two-metre long texts that flicker between the academic and the poetic and surreal. Dissecting waged labour, work discipline and productivism, worth every minute encourages the viewer to question the naturalness or necessity of work as we know it and imagine a different way of being in the world.

Desire Line(s) | Dance Plant Collective

Desire Line(s) | Dance Plant Collective

Opening event Wednesday August 8, from 5.00pm

Studio One Toi Tu, Gallery 1, Auckland

Dance Plant Collective presents a creative compilation of their ten-monthlong artist residency at Studio One Toi Tū. On opening night expect a re-configured roaming performance of their debut contemporary dance work Desire Line(s), bringing alive the walls and pockets in and around historic Studio One Toi Tū.

The collective’s exhibition features a permanent installation of curated video footage and other interdisciplinary and collaborative experiments. Dance Plant Collective will also be hosting community movement classes during the exhibition period, giving an insight into the collective’s daily physical practice.

Experiences of Clay | Jack Tilson

Experiences of Clay | Jack Tilson

Opening event WEdnesday August 8, from 5.00pm

Studio One Toi Tu, Gallery 2, Auckland

Tilson has used his Studio One Toi Tū residency to investigate a relationship between physical form and technology through a collaborative digital mapping project titled Experiences of Clay.

In this project he maps place and landscape, but it has also become an exposition of people sharing their personal connection to the landscape. Accompanying his online project Tilson displays a collection of ceramics made from different naturally occurring clay materials gathered by hand from locations throughout New Zealand.

Image courtesy of Studio One Toi Tu

StJohn Milgrew | Cell Block Portraits & (Sub)Urban Landscapes

StJohn Milgrew | Cell Block Portraits & (Sub)Urban Landscapes

Opening event Wednesday August 8, from 5.00pm

Studio One Toi Tu, Gallery 3, Auckland 

Stjohn Milgrew is a photographer and director whose practice focuses on documentary film. He is currently exploring his passion for vintage film photography.

Stjohn has transformed an original padded jail cell at Studio One Toi Tū into an open photography studio. Here he has captured visitors to the precinct and recorded his observations of disappearing and emerging scenes from the ever changing landscapes of central and greater Auckland.

 

Toni Gill | Kamatayan Gang; Blood, Fire and Rage

Toni Gill | Kamatayan Gang; Blood, Fire and Rage

Opening event Wednesday August 8, from 5.00pm

Studio One Toi Tu, Gallery 4, Auckland

Toni Gill has used her residency to study female representation and action film, and to delve into the culture of her Filipino roots through researching related motifs, folklore and creative practices.

The artist whose practice spans painting, graphic design and embroidery is interested in depicting feminist ideas using an outsider-art aesthetic, due to its roots in countercultural movements. She is presenting a series of large-scale paintings hung by chain and barbed wire.

Colleen Altagracia | The Slide

Colleen Altagracia | The Slide

Corner Window Gallery, Auckland

Emerging Auckland artist, Colleen Altagracia responds to closed doors and missing ‘welcome’ mats in her apartment building: tenants displaced, evicted, gone.

The Slide at Corner Window Gallery is Project 045 and the Final Project to be hosted in the space.
The project space will be disestablished in September.

Image: Colleen Altagracia, The Slide, 2018

Elliot Collins | A Memory of the River

Elliot Collins | A Memory of the River

Nathan Homestead, Auckland 

A Memory of the River is the result of the Elliot Collins’ time spent at Kriti Gallery artist in residence programme in Varanasi, India earlier this year, funded through the Asia New Zealand Foundation.

The work explores the subtle and nuanced, often indescribable nature of life by the sacred Ganges. With painting, video and photography, the artist attempts to capture a city and its atmosphere that defies explanation.

While always aware of his exile and otherness, Collins strove to gently capture the ordinary and everyday nature of this indefinable site. A holy place of pilgrimage with its ringing temple bells, chanting parishioners, bathing devotees, twenty-four-hour cremations and the fast-changing embrace of contemporary Indian life.

MATUA - works of the wise | Group Exhibtion

MATUA - works of the wise | Group Exhibtion

Opening event Thursday August 9, from 5.30pm

[tacit] Gallery, Hamilton

Artists Mama Bateseba Daniel, Si’ufaitoto’a Simanu Ieremia, Charles Krause, Etevise Nikolao, Pusi Urale and Louisa Humphry. Guest curator for [tacit] gallery 2018, Leafa Wilson.

MATUA is an acknowledgement of those who informed some of our Moana Pacific artists’ personal creative histories. Art history has labelled their type of artistic output as ‘outsider’, ‘naïve’ and ‘craft’, none of which are incorrect, but none of which considers the individual’s prior learning and philosophies. For this reason, it is a celebration of intuitive and memory-based art practice. Their works are unfettered-by-art-history execution.

As is part of the Moana Pacific cultures, the curator takes this opportunity to acknowledge elders and ancestors as the filament that lit the way for many. Their abstract thought in physical form gave birth to more abstract thought. It is a privilege to have their art objects/ taonga/measina with us still.

[tacit] gallery is nestled upstairs at 223 Victoria Street, Hamilton, within The Creators Collective.
As they are upstairs in an older building, unfortunately [tacit] is not wheelchair accessible.

Asaba |  Katsumi Asaba & Dean Poole

Asaba | Katsumi Asaba & Dean Poole

Opening event, Friday August 10, from 6.30pm

Objectspace, Auckland

This exhibition showcases a selection of Asaba’s typographic posters that explore different visual languages from around the world. One of Asaba’s goals has been to forge a connection between contemporary graphic design and ancient writing systems. His principal area of expertise lies in the pictographic Dongba script used by the Naxi tribe from Lijiang in the Yunnan province of southwest China. It is the last living pictographic script left on the planet.

Asaba has played table tennis competitively around the world. He holds the title of sixth degree master in table tennis from the Japan Table Tennis Association. His art direction has changed the visual representation of the sport itself. He is responsible for changing the colour of ping-pong tables from dark green to blue and the ball to yellow. He is the ambassador for ‘Solo Ping Pong Diplomacy’, which has led him to play in more than 30 countries. Many of Asaba’s posters record his playing of the sport in extreme situations, including a frozen lake in Hokkaido and a floating ping-pong table in Israel’s Dead Sea.

Katsumi Asaba’s invitation to play in New Zealand is the Asaba Table – an interactive sculpture designed by Dean Poole. It sees the standard ping-pong table reinvented as one-part science experiment, one-part musical instrument. In this table ping-pong balls levitate out of voids; it can also return a shot or spit a ball out at random. This table is not only a surface for a collaborative performance, it is an object that becomes a participant in the game, with a spirit of its own.

Between the beach and the lounge | Group Show

Between the beach and the lounge | Group Show

Opening event Friday August 10, from 6.00pm

play_station, Wellington

Commonalities between Bikini Wax (Mexico) and play_station (Aotearoa/New Zealand) expand beyond specific approaches. For starters, we are all broke. By extension, there is a drive to nurture and create culture from the perspective of creating and making. Looking to develop conversations that bypass geographical location to address different methods and struggles of becoming an artist whilst running an artist run spaces.

Bikini Wax and play_station set a sail to the middle of the pacific, shitty old boat rocking about, inflatable and overloaded with the combination of AV equipment and FedeX. We are transmitting inland.

Artists: Alejandra Avilés, Daniel Aguilar Ruvalcaba, Bent, Wendy Cabrera Rubio, Paloma Contreras Lomas, Juliana Garza Maldonado, Cristóbal Gracia, Kane Laing, Agustina Leal, irak morales, Pippy McClenaghan & Tyler Jackson, Margot Mills & Laura Duffy, Bijan Moosavi, Chantal Peñalosa, Caroline Schattling Villeval, Israel Urmeer and Marek Wolfryd.

Paul² | Dissimulation 2.0

Paul² | Dissimulation 2.0

Opening Friday August 10, from 6.00pm

play_station, Wellington 

Tasmanian visual artists Paul² bring their upside down world of installation, sculpture and large scale imagery to Wellington for their international debut exhibition, Dissimulation 2.0.

Dissimulation 2.0 is a new site specific work that lifts colour, shape and scale directly from Playstation ARI’s yellow room and environment; playing on techniques of abstraction to create an immersive space.

Paul Squared is a collaborative project with award-winning sculptor Paul Murphy, and visual artist Paul Eggins that fuses Murphy’s architectural skills with Eggin’s experience in street art and grafitti. Adopting concepts of camouflage through the use of shapes, structures, and colour, Eggins & Murphy aim to remove the audience members from their pre-conceived idea of the space it is installed within. Their exhibitions flip the space, creating undulating shapes and new notions of what gallery and architectural spaces can be, and do.

Dissimulation 2.0 will be completely modelled on found materials and sourced objects from Wellington, with Paul² thrilled by the opportunity and challenge to create something completely from scratch in a new country; neither of them have visited.

Benjamin Work: Write it on the land, Seal it on the hear

Benjamin Work: Write it on the land, Seal it on the hear

Opening event Saturday August 11, from 4pm – 6pm
(Spring Exhibition Opening)

Te Tuhi, Auckland

For Te Tuhi’s Project Wall, Benjamin Work has created a wall painting which calls into question symbols associated with nationhood and identity.

The artist deconstructs the Tongan Royal Flag in order to address the adoption of imperial symbols, and the subsequent devaluing of traditional motifs, to fit within the narrative of civilisation imposed by the English, French and Spanish colonial powers. Work reverses this relationship by incorporating indigenous symbols of wealth and power. A fala (woven mat) will be provided for the viewer to sit on and engage with the work, transforming Te Tuhi’s foyer space into a site of self-determination.

Image: Benjamin Work, Write it on the land, Seal it on the heart, 2018, commissioned by Te Tuhi, Auckland

Hikalu Clarke | Accurate Community Projections

Hikalu Clarke | Accurate Community Projections

Opening event Saturday August 11, from 4pm – 6pm
(Spring Exhibition Opening)

Te Tuhi, Auckland 

When Victor Gruen designed the first enclosed shopping complex, he envisioned it to operate as a communal gathering site – a balance of commerce, entertainment and art, with the intention of reducing the necessity of cars and to reinvigorate a sense of community. Ultimately, Gruen’s vision failed as these mega structures only contributed to the suburban sprawl he attempted to combat. Two years before Gruen’s death, he renounced his utopic vision, claiming: “I would like to take this opportunity to disclaim paternity once and for all. I refuse to pay alimony to those bastard developments. They destroyed our cities.”

For the Te Tuhi Billboards, Hikalu Clarke co-opts the visual vocabulary of advertising and retail developers to question how these ‘public’ arenas entrench hegemonic power and operate as hubs for data procurement. Situated on the outer wall of Pakuranga Plaza, Clarke’s CG images reflect the fortress-like construction of these mega structures. Comprised of abstracted details taken from stills, the billboards speak a network language linked by captions taken from yearly performance reports. The language used is both painfully optimistic, and at times inhuman and cold.

Image: Hikalu Clarke, Accurate Community Projections, 2018, comissioned by Te Tuhi, Auckland

International Group Show | From where I stand, my eye will send a light to you in the North

International Group Show | From where I stand, my eye will send a light to you in the North

Opening event Saturday August 11, from 4pm – 6pm
(Spring Exhibition Opening)

Te Tuhi, Auckland

Curated by Gabriela Salgado

This exhibition takes its title from artist Otobong Nkanga’s performance piece Diaoptasia, presented at Tate Modern, London in 2015. Instead of departing from a theme, the exhibition’s foundations are laid from a selection of works on paper by Nkanga, which provided space for other artists’ works to address the need to challenge Eurocentric historical narratives.

Nkanga’s prints from the series Social Consequences engage with a number of issues through graphically sparse depictions of human bodies and natural resources caught in dystopian entanglements. Her work departs from the observation of stone and minerals to shed light on the contradictions of wealth-producing economies and their restrictive access to gains. Drawing eloquent parallels between minerals and language, Nkanga’s works depict humans that appear to be connected by tools through processes of fracturing, cutting and carving out, evoking language’s constant metamorphosis. Her analysis of minerals as a metonymy for society shows us that we are made of a great variety of elements that react to pressure, heat and other physical forces.

This exhibition encompasses works by international and local artists dealing with a number of poignant subjects in an attempt to shed light over the multiple manifestations of our contemporary ills as seen from the geopolitical south. Their insightful works remind us how the emergence of imperial capitalism in the early 16thcentury led the way to the relentless extraction of raw materials that has continued to the present day. They signal how such intense exploration of natural resources has unleashed what we have come to acknowledge as a migration and climate emergency, generating perpetual economic and human crises whose substrate all but hide the colonial wounds inflicted in the past.

In the same manner that dominant narratives have instigated a partial reading of human history to build a canonical version of reality, it can also be argued that the history of art is biased. Since the idea of Modernity was coined, ways of thinking about high art and craftsmanship have been largely determined by historical conditioning grounded in a binary model of conquerors and oppressed; educated and unqualified; masters and slaves; powerful and disenfranchised; explorers and providers; civilised and primitive.

By bringing to Aotearoa works from all corners of the world, the exhibiting artists invite us to share in numerous knowledge systems and histories which, as light emanating from their eyes, can help illuminate our path.

Image: Otobong Nkanga, Social Consequences I: Crisis, 2009

Kalisolaite ‘Uhila | First will be last and last, first

Kalisolaite ‘Uhila | First will be last and last, first

Opening event Saturday August 11, from 11.00am

Michael Lett, Auckland 

Please note that the exhibition will involve a performance work which will take place Thursday’s and Friday’s between 11.00am – 4.00pm, and Saturday’s between 11.00am – 1.00pm. The gallery’s usual opening hours will still apply.

Lisa Reihana | whitianga <<>> the crossing

Lisa Reihana | whitianga <<>> the crossing

Milford Galleries, Dunedin

whitianga <<>> the crossing explores Māori mythologies surrounding death and mourning and at the same time invites consideration of the universal stories that are created to describe the journey from the land of the living to that of the dead. Using lightbox-mounted stills taken from Lisa Reihana’s video work, Tai Whetuki – House of Death Redux(1), the goddess of death and the night, Hine-nui-te-pō, guides a dead warrior through an underworld where land and human are intimately entwined.

Image: Lisa Reihana, Veins, 2018

Maureen Lander | Flat-Pack Whakapapa

Maureen Lander | Flat-Pack Whakapapa

Opening Saturday August 11, from 4.00pm

Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery, Auckland

Artist Talk with Maureen Lander: Saturday 11 August, 3pm

Flat-Pack Whakapapa builds on the notion that our whakapapa is always with us. As such, her installations can be packed down into individual weavings: easily carried around, reconfigured and added onto later. This approach symbolises how our whakapapa grows with us, and how our genealogy is inherited and carried by the descendants who continue on our lines of heritage. The exhibition explores the connections between whakapapa and raranga (Maori weaving). Approaching these forms of human connection from a matauranga Maori perspective (Maori knowledge), Lander engages with weaving techniques—including whiri (braiding) and whakairo (patterning)—and the concept of aho tuku iho (ancestral lines handed down continuously from generation to generation).

Flat-Pack Whakapapa at Te Uru will also include two new installations made in collaboration with local weavers and school children. Developed both during and over the course of the exhibition, these new works continue Lander’s interest in how to address customary ideas in relevant ways for newer generations.

Flat-Pack Whakapapa is developed and toured by The Dowse Art Museum, who presented the exhibition in Lower Hutt, 2017.

 

Rotorua Creative Communities Scheme

Rotorua Creative Communities Scheme

Applications close Wednesday September 26

The Rotorua Creative Communities Scheme is seeking applications for funding for local arts projects.The scheme’s main focus is to stimulate and provide support to arts and culture projects which:

  • encourage community involvement;
  • support the diversity and cultural traditions of local communities, enriching and promoting their uniqueness and cultural diversity; or
  •  enable and encourage young people (less than 18 yrs.) to engage with and actively participate in the arts.
  • Please note that this opportunity is restricted to the Rotorua Area, as the project must take place within the city or district where the application is made.

For further information and how to apply click here.

Image: Affinity Light Installation, Rotorua Lakes Council Instagram, 24.04.2017

Workshop | Reading, reflecting and responding: a series of art writing workshops with Francis McWhannell

Workshop | Reading, reflecting and responding: a series of art writing workshops with Francis McWhannell

Led by freelance writer and curator, Francis McWhannell, presented in partnership with Te Tuhi and Artists Alliance.

Reading, reflecting and responding aims to help new writers hone their skills in responding to art creatively and critically. The programme will involve a combination of short presentations by the tutor, group discussions, and writing tasks. The first three sessions will centre on texts by well-known art writers, including art historical essays, exhibition texts, personal responses, and reviews.

Prior to each workshop, participants will be provided with digital copies of two texts and will make brief notes about both. These notes will form the basis of a group discussion. Each participant will also choose one essay to respond to and will produce a concise critique (approximately 500 words). The tutor will provide feedback to each participant in writing at the beginning of the next session.

The final workshop will take a different form. Participants will come with a piece of art writing of 800–1,000 words in length to be workshopped. Each will discuss the text briefly (no more than five minutes), highlighting any difficulties and successes experienced. The group will give constructive feedback and the pieces will be reworked before being submitted for final review by the tutor.

The tutor, Francis McWhannell, is a freelance writer and curator. He holds a Bachelor of Arts (Hons) from the University of Auckland, where he is currently completing a Masters in Art History. He has written for various arts and culture magazines and websites, including Art News New Zealand, HOME, and Runway Conversations. From 2016 to 2017 he was Visual Arts Editor at the Pantograph Punch.

Dates:              August 13, 20, 27 and Sept 3, 5.30-7.30pm

Location:         The Open Book, 201 Ponsonby Rd, Ponsonby, Auckland

Price:               $160 to attend the full suite of four workshops

Please note these workshops will be limited to 10 participants.

Open Call | Damp Ocean Publication and Projects 2018-19

Open Call | Damp Ocean Publication and Projects 2018-19

Submissions close Saturday September 15

Damp Ocean, Wellington

Damp Ocean are developing a multi-dimensional space through which to develop, extend, express and realise work which seeks to achieve real and lasting cultural affect.

The three avenues that Damp Ocean curently have are: online (video, audio, short form text, digital), book publication (long form text/etc.), and practical enagement (workshops).  Damp Ocean also have a shop, selling objects that represent or extend their ethos (dampocean.storenvy.com)

Damp Ocean is particularly Interested in works that:

  1. Interrogate the particolonial relationship of humans to the physical and emotion environment both through practices and conception.
  2. explore and expose the relationship between body and land/time/space/dimensionality (deep-time, infinitude, positionality, spatiotemporalisation, differentiation, identity.
  3. are not anthropocentric in positionality, seek to resolve disparities between practices and discourses.

Site: They are hosting online space for media work on dampocean.world/ which seeks to activate and effect shifts in and through the bodies that engage with it. Damp Ocean is also looking for short  fprm text works, as long as they also seek to achieve real affect, as opposed to simply describing affects and processes, or fleshing out conceptual frameworks/agendas.

Books: Similarly to the site, we are interested on long form text or book work, as long as it is greared towards, or developed through direct, tangible, applicable, practical engagement, for example, doing a book + workshop combo could work well.

Workshops: Lastly they are looking for people with whom to develop parts of our workshop series (which started last month at meanwhile gallery). These are the most impotant element in the damp ocean agenda, as they are intended to directly impliment the practicable and immediate affect of any other ideas etc. we deal with (in any other media or in our heads).

Selections will be made around mid-September. Though Damp Ocean is open to discussing alternative time frames if need be. They are open to proposals and suggestions in any format, academic or conceptual posturing are not necessary.

Submit proposals to friends@dampocean.world
voice, video and txt submissions can sent via google drive link

Image: Damp Ocean, Workshop 2: Reading World, @meanwhile.gallery, 23.07.18

 

 

 

 

 

Catherine Clayton-Smith | Root Channel 

Catherine Clayton-Smith | Root Channel 

Opening event Wednesday August 15, from 5.30pm

Bartley + Company Art, Wellington 

A kind of knowingness, a strange beauty and a sense of something not quite definably familiar pervades the five medium to large paintings presented in this exhibition. A confident assertion of painting’s power, these constructed landscapes speak to life, to colour and the world we live in as suggestions, fragments and hints of things seen, experienced, felt.

Nature is prominent, weather patterns and earthquake forms surface; stillness and motion collide; colour jumps and surface components cohere to poetically open out a psychological space where, despite the unchanging canvas, meaning has mobility, response is felt, and nothing is absolute.

Image: Catherine Clayton-Smith, Sado-Motivator, 2018

Dilohana Lekamge | Amateur Āyurveda

Dilohana Lekamge | Amateur Āyurveda

Opening event Wednesday August 15, from 6.00pm

Window Gallery, Auckland 

Sourced from personal accounts, online and academic research Amateur Āyurveda explores Lekamge’s familial and cultural history with Āyurvedic practice – a medicinal practice founded in the Indian subcontinent.

The installation centres around treatments that remedied a family member’s shoulder calcification and other ailments. This involved the use of a lime and salt bath to aid with foot swelling and kizhi treatment (herbal powders wrapped with muslin and tied in a bolus), in order to ease pain in the shoulder.

The videos mimic the warm and dimly-lit images of international Āyurveda Medical Centre brochures whilst acknowledging the challenges of accessing information about Āyurvedic practice from a non-Western lens in Aotearoa. Focusing on herbal and plant-based remedies over chemical remedies, these practices are regularly approached with scepticism because of the introduction of Western medicine and the exoticisation of Eastern cultures. From the perspective of a Sri Lankan diaspora, Lekamge uses performance as a form of personal research to explore how these treatments healed previous generations of her family.

Evan Heasman "Soju Shots" | Plume

Evan Heasman "Soju Shots" | Plume

Opening event Friday August 17, from 5.00pm

Megan Dickinson Gallery, Whangarei

Image: Soju Shots, Consulting the Sea Queen, Instagram @soju_shots, July 25.

Games and Politics | Exhibtion

Games and Politics | Exhibtion

Opening event Wednesday August 15, from 5.30pm

The Physics Room, Christchurch 

An interactive exhibition by the Goethe-Institut, in cooperation with ZKM | Centre for Art and Media, which has been touring worldwide. The exhibition features 18 significant politically-ambitious video games, and encourages viewers to examine how they each unfold their unique political potential.

A game is always more than just a game. Without considering the influence of the society that plays it, it remains just as impossible to understand as without considering its influence on that society. And yet, chants of euphoric praise for the immersive potential of pedagogical propaganda are as inadequate vis-à-vis the diversity of contemporary computer games as are undifferentiated media debates about ego-shooter games that glorify violence and ought to vanish from the bedrooms of young people.

Artists are using the medium in order to open its functions up to scrutiny and to explore where the boundary of games now lie. Reflections on the phenomenon of computer games from the perspective of cultural sciences, however, continue to be few and far between in the discourse of art institutions. Games and Politics is intended to close this gap, at least in part, and is based on the exhibition Global Games by the ZKM (Zentrum für Kunst und Medien) in Karlsruhe, but focuses on explicitly political games created since 2004

Image: Kurosh ValaNejad and Peter Brinson, The Cat and the Coup, 2018.

Purpose-bulit | Group Show

Purpose-bulit | Group Show

Opening event Wednesday August 15, from 5.30pm

Enjoy Public Art Gallery, Wellington

Artist: Louisa Afoa, Frontyard, Hyperreadings, Tim Larkin with Abe Hollingsworth
Curated by Sophie Davis and Louise Rutledge

Drawing on public infrastructure and collections of personal knowledge, Purpose-built examines contemporary sites of sharing, accessing and archiving information—probing the relationship between memory and physical space. Bringing together artworks, furniture, reading lists and digital content, the resulting installation sits somewhere between a space of display and a reading room. Visitors are encouraged to make use of the furniture and resources during the exhibition.

For more information on this show click here.

Image: Tim Larkin with Abe Hollingsworth, 2018

AND THEN WHAT? | Group Show

AND THEN WHAT? | Group Show

Opening event Thursday August 16, from 5.30pm

St Paul Street Galleries One and Two, Auckland

Tautai presents the Tertiary Show and exhibition ‘AND THEN WHAT?’.
Art and activism through a Pacific lens.

Artists: Katharine Atafu-Mayo, Daniel Ellison, Jessie Hack, Taiese John Leapai, ‘Ofa Lehā, Tehlor-Lina Mareko, ‘Uhila Kanongata’a Nai, Tyrun Posimani, Kahurangiariki Smith, Lastman So’oula and Naawie Tutugoro. Curated by Rosanna Raymond.

‘AND THEN WHAT?’ includes installations, performative and sound works, moving image and painting. As well as opening night performances and artists talks, the project includes a women’s only gathering that focuses on cultural ceremonies, attitudes to sex and blood rites.

Counter-Sites: Onsite | Group Show

Counter-Sites: Onsite | Group Show

Opening event Thursday August 16, from 5.00pm

Elam School of Fine Arts, Auckland

Venues: Elam Projectspace Gallery west, George Fraser Gallery , Fine Arts Library & Main Building 432 Foyers.
Walking tour starts at Projectspace 5.30pm

“The heterotopia is capable of juxtaposing in a single real place several spaces, several sites that are in themselves incompatible”
-Foucault, Michel. “Of Other Space: Utopia and Heterotopias.”

Elam Studio International’s 2018 annual exhibition, a collective project of 34 artists and contributors. We envision this exhibition to be one of simultaneity and the side-by-side.

COUNTER-SITES: ONSITE is Foucault’s heterotopia, defying binary disjunctions and intersecting the mutually exclusive.
COUNTER-SITES: ONSITE is one site and several sites; it is an abstract temporary whole that cannot decide between fragmentation and unity, inside and outside.
COUNTER-SITES: ONSITE is a non-site; existing comfortably as the other space, remaining in this temporality and spatiality.

It is a multitude: complex links, connections and contradictions boxed together. Not waiting to be unpacked or rationalised, but subjected to ongoing changes, contested and re-imagined.

Greta Anderson | No Hoarding

Greta Anderson | No Hoarding

Opening event Thursday August 16, from 6.00pm

Two Rooms, Auckland

Things are made strange in Greta Anderson’s photographs, isolated on a pitch-dark background: it is the black of the darkroom and the photographer’s studio, the black of night and the field of dreams. Anderson’s objects appear to float within these inner and outer spaces, emerging from nothingness and in to the light. Their surrounding context removed, her still lives take on iconic, mystical or surrealist qualities, cushioned in still, inky oblivion. Many of the hoarded objects reframed here may have been designed or destined to be discarded. The inexpensive, often disposable plastic objects which feature in No Hoarding speak to the tension between the innovations of the oil-based economies which have enabled their production and their corresponding impact on our precarious ecological systems. Anderson sees these petrochemical plastics as potential artefacts of the future, imagining a time when they are no longer such a dominant, high risk material. In their new imagined role, Anderson casts this curated selection of things as ambivalent artefacts of the plastic age within a future museum – miniature monuments to human hubris. And yet, Anderson’s elegantly printed and framed photographs also represent collectables capable of entering one’s own hoardings.

Image: Greta Anderson, No Hoarding – Cross, 2018

Paul Woodruffe & Russell Jackson | Duo Exhibition

Paul Woodruffe & Russell Jackson | Duo Exhibition

Opening event Thursday August 16, from 6.00pm

nkb Gallery, Auckland

Paul Woodruffe: In the Garden
Woodruffe’s exhibition brings together the artist’s love for Medieval garden paintings and patterns found in Eastern fabrics and ceramics. The garden represents the harmonious relationship humans can have with both the natural world and their subconscious world, a harmony that has in many western based societies, been replaced by a retreat from reality. These paintings map this retreat.The figures navigate these gardens, and present simultaneously both a belonging and a disconnection, this dichotomy is shown through their composition of abstractions and mimicry of nature. These works are a celebration of the artist’s desire to be both connected to nature, and to be apart from it through the remaking of it in his own image. 

Russell Jackson: New Works
Russell Jackson’s interest in nature and the pastoral elements of his local environment have been at the heart of his output. Jackson’s recent paintings, supported by the addition of his sculptural wall hanging coral work, detail the growth of the artists practice, as well as changes to the environment. 

Image: Paul Woodruffe, The Reunion

Shaun Waugh | A Second Look

Shaun Waugh | A Second Look

Opening event Thursday August 16, from 6.00pm

Two Rooms, Auckland

Shaun Waugh foregrounds the medium of photography as a primary subject in his work. The exhibition A Second Look invites the viewer to encounter Waugh’s image constructions while reconsidering the histories, technologies and conventions of photography though which phenomena are made visible and presented for spectatorship. Waugh skilfully weaves an engagement with recent advances in camera technologies, algorithms in contemporary post-production, and the digital artefacts which can result from their interpretive processes. Photographs of objects captured at different focal lengths are digitally stitched across the image surface, or layered and composited in pictorial space. They engage the still life and landscape genres, while Waugh also turns his lens reflectively back on photography itself. Here we may perceive photography as a dynamic mix of raw data, the everyday and the stuff of spectacle.

Image: Shaun Waugh, Still Life 17, 2018 (detail)

Tilt | Group Show

Tilt | Group Show

Hopkinson Mossman, Wellington

Group exhibition of new work by Anoushka Akel, Ruth Buchanan, and Meg Porteous.

Tilt brings together three materially diverse practices – painting, installation, photography – that share an interest in observing, translating and making visible often imperceptible rules, structures, systems, or frames we inhabit.

Image: Meg Porteous, 40 denier (looking for corporate womenswear), 2018

Clare Caldwell | In Time

Clare Caldwell | In Time

Opening event Saturday August 18, from 2pm

Depot Artspace, Main Gallery, Auckland

For Clare (Claudie) Caldwell art is the initial impulse,  a filter through which to decipher subliminal, pre-cognitive and cognitive responses to her inner and outer worlds, a way of making sense of and sharing ‘conversations’ about things that are important. In Time is an allegorical narrative of paintings on Angelic intervention: its arrival, its absence and its re-intervention.

The exhibition is a response to the imagery that has mentally and spiritually bombarded the artist, often seemingly random, but now forming a cohesive whole. It has an urgency about it. It seems it is a story that wants to be told.

Clare believes one of the roles of the artist is to ask the hard questions, to challenge established beliefs, like a societal watchdog. In a world currently dominated by the cult of the decadent, the ugly and the secular, art has largely abandoned its role of transcending these dystopias and connecting us to an ‘otherness’ – a connection to what is Divine, that connects to the Divine within us.

It is a loss that severs what she believes to be the pursuit of our sacred purpose on this planet.

 

 

Winter Wonderfest | Whanganui

Winter Wonderfest | Whanganui

Opening event Saturday August 18, from 5.30pm

Space Studio and Galllery, Whanganui 

FRESH START features artists: Emma Cunningham, Catherine Macdonald, Lynn Hurst, Justine Godsall, Emma Camden, Rachael Garland, Vanessa Edwards, Katherine Claypole, Leigh Anderton-Hall, Jill Stegmann, Sarah Williams, Carla Donson, MB Stoneman, Margaret Silverwood.

More information on Winter Wonderfest here. 

Barbara Tuck | Bloom Bay

Barbara Tuck | Bloom Bay

Opening event Sunday August 19, from 3.00pm

Anna Miles Gallery, Auckland

Barbara Tuck has been occupied by painterly expression for over five decades. She has enmeshed abstract and figurative modes of working and cultivated complex paintings in the terrain between these two historic poles. The ‘Bloom’ in the title of this exhibition reprises a notion she has referenced previously. Slow degrees of ocean, her paintings of 2006 were in part impelled by Emiliania huxleyi, an algae notable for its streaky blooms visible from space, that has been attributed as significant to the ways the earth regulates its temperature. Tuck’s first-hand experience of the balancing acts and attractions that sustain a painting inform her fascination with the delicate chemistry that holds the natural world together. In the context of her new paintings, ‘bloom’ may allude to the hope of cyclical renewal at a time of diasporic movement of peoples across borders.

Image: Barbara Tuck, Borderland, 2018

 

Bounce | Group Exhibition

Bounce | Group Exhibition

Opening event Tuesday August 21, from 5.00pm

Grey, Auckland

Artists: Lyn Dallison, Juliette Laird and Carol Lee-Honson

When we see something bounce, it seems so simple – just a rebound, a ricochet. But a bounce is more than this. It is a process, a series of intricate reactions not necessarily discerned by the human eye.

A bounce begins with something being let go or let fly. Once set in motion, this thing will gather speed and energy until its surface makes contact with another. There is a collision. Here momentum is slowed and on impact, the two entities flex. They deform and distort. At the same time, energy is exchanged between the two and dispersed into the immediate surroundings. This sharing of energy during the collision, as well as the elasticity of things and their ability to flex, enables the change of direction we define as a bounce.

It is the release of artistic ideas, and the collision with another artist, which enables the bounce that is this exhibition. These artists have explored the processes, the deforming and distorting energy and allowed each change of direction.

Sholto Buck & Antonia Nisbet | Dual Show

Sholto Buck & Antonia Nisbet | Dual Show

Opening event Wednesday August 22, from 6.00pm

RM Gallery, Auckland

Forest of Ladders
Sholto Buck
Forest of Ladders is a project which explores the self through world-building. It is an atmospheric encyclopedia, an exercise done by the artist in order to catalogue their own sensibility.

To do this, a series of short, short stories has been written, each one an account of an imaginary place or scene. Although written as individual stories, these texts form a body of work which teases idiosyncratic modes of perception. This is developed through the decision to write each text by hand, and through photography. The stories have been handwritten and then photographed against windows, shot from the inside looking out. Despite this project being formed around the description of places and worlds, its consistency of style and voice, both in material form and content, reveals the presence of a self; a specific subjectivity which emerges through images of place.

Forest of Ladders negotiates concepts of otherness through a study of place. Places which are not here, those which could become here. Places which can be seen, and those which can only be read. It is a meeting of here and there, brought into form through the conjunction of photography and writing. By bringing these opposing elements together, I hope to create an atmosphere; a sense of something forming.

Take care now
Antonia Nisbet
Take care now is a body of work that arises from a felt response-ability, and an accumulation of response. These responses are sensitively assembled and realised on purpose-made screen mechanisms within a video-projection based installation. There is a futile quality to the responsive gestures performed, privileging the minor gestures and emotional labour that become embedded within daily processes of caring. The kinds of caring the work is concerned with consciously reject the individualistic and the grandeur, and often approaches things from an ecological perspective. It acknowledges the multiplicity of already existing social, political and environmental processes, for better or worse, as well the subtleties and nuances that complicate such binaries. Take care now over time has become rooted in maintenance and continuation, developing gestures that have become grounded against prevailing capitalistic markers of what is considered valuable work. The porous and durational threshold between art-making and life-living means the tools for caring have been lifted directly from the artists own material vocabulary and practices of life-living which accumulate as small realities of care-based economies.

Accompanying Take care now is the open invitation to receive handwritten ‘newsletters’ from the artist throughout the duration of the show.

Twenty Five | Group Show

Twenty Five | Group Show

Opening event Thursday August 23, from 6.00pm

Flagstaff Gallery, Auckland 

An incredible group show to celebrate 25 years in Devonport, featuring new original works from
Michael Smither, Tony Ogle, Gillie and Marc, Richard Smith, Mary Taylor, Sean Chen,
Jody Hope-Gibbons, Russell Jackson, Fraser Williamson, Anna Palmer, Matt Griffin, Rae West,
Heather Wilson, Jane Gray, Philippa Bentley, Daniella Hulme, Fraser Williamson, Angela Maritz, Brad Novak,
Talulah Nunes Lautrec, Kiya Nancarrow, Mike Hodge, Janet Mazenier, Lee Kleiman, Olivier Duhamel, Fane Flaws, Richard Higham, Sarah Paulin, Terry Prince, Anne Dillon, Helena Verhaaren, Amy Hoedemakers
Michael Anderson, Muriel Garrett, Ken Garrett, Diana Peel, Che Rogers, Linda McFetridge, Adam Popovic,
Anna Church, Lucy G and introducing some exciting new to gallery artists!

Entangled | Claire Hughes with Isaac Lundy

Entangled | Claire Hughes with Isaac Lundy

Toi Pōneke Gallery, Wellington 

This virtual reality artwork invites you to experience the spatial disruptions of scientific entanglement.

By putting on a VR headset, gallery visitors will be enmeshed in both real and virtual realms, depicted from multiple perspectives. Viewers will be taken on a journey through scientific apparatus and space-time curves to discover new worlds, questioning their understanding of reality.

Ipukarea | Group Show

Ipukarea | Group Show

Opening event Friday August 24, from 6.00pm

Tacit Gallery, Hamilton 

Curated by Ellie Lee-Duncan and Te Inuwai Nathan

Laura Duffy |  Garden of Purity

Laura Duffy | Garden of Purity

Courtenay Place Light Boxes, Wellington

Garden of Purity considers how we read and ingest imagery, drawing links through history from art history to advertising.Duffy sees the works as being a layered conversation about Catholicism, advertising, abjection, and queerness.She uses edible materials as a starting point for the series of digitally manipulated photographs in the light boxes and online video works. The series intends to prompt questions about traditional notions of beauty and divinity by blurring the lines between repulsion and desire.

To view the video artworks and read the text that is part of the series, visit: gardenofpurity.space

Nicola Jackson | The Bloggs

Nicola Jackson | The Bloggs

Opening event Friday August 24, from 5.30pm

Centre of Contemporary Arts, Christchurch

Nicola Jackson has created her own version of an anatomy museum, filling vitrines and cabinets with a range of curious objects and adorning the walls with paintings of inquisitive characters. Interested in the intersections of science, psychology, museology and art history, Jackson’s work often has an autobiographical element to it. It is also humanist in nature, being about any old Joe Bloggs.

Billie Culy | Windows

Billie Culy | Windows

Opening event Saturday August 25, from 11.00am

Parlour Projects, Hastings

Billie Culy has previously drawn on flower arrangements to examine traditional still-life painting, reconfiguring its treatment of colours and textures into the medium of photography. In Windows, Culy continues her recurring theme of still-life arrangements, this time employing found objects from local second-hand stores, and re-imagining them in constructed sets. In doing so, Culy transforms the banality of household objects into whimsical, mysterious and imaginary still-life scenes. By shifting our attention to ordinary everyday objects—a faded tapestry, a porcelain vase, a lace tablecloth—Culy helps us to find the charm and joy in the everyday.

Image: Billie Culy, Offering, 2018

Changes | Willie Docherty

Changes | Willie Docherty

Opening event Saturday August 25, from 1.00pm

Taylor-Jensen Fine Arts, Palmerston North

Entitled ‘Changes’ the exhibition consists of 24 new paintings on paper derived from a series of landscapes previously exhibited by the artist.  Docherty states: “These new works share the same starting point, the New Zealand landscape, ever changing and permanent and the New Zealand skyline constantly in a state of change.”  .

Hau | Group Exhibtion

Hau | Group Exhibtion

Opening event Saturday August 25, from 10.30am

Papakura Art Gallery, Auckland

Papakura Art Gallery presents the annual Tautai – Guiding Pacific Arts Trust supported exhibition. Hau is Maori for essence. Something that is left behind when someone passes on. Through photography, sculpture, jewellery and selected objects, five local artists alongside the community respond to memorials in Papakura and ask how do we deal with trauma, death and history?

Hau is an investigation around the unspoken stories of Papakura. Hidden histories and taboo topics are revealed through relatable considered narratives. Artists are asked to respond to issues surrounding historical social constructs within Papakura. Exploring memorials / or public markers of death from both a historical and contemporary context.

Hau pervades the whole body yet is not located in any particular part of the body. A portion of Hau can be gathered in a lock of hair, clothing or even from a footstep in the soil. A memorial, item or place where someone who has passed can possess a person’s Hau

Public Programme, Saturday September 8, from 11.00am to 1.00pm.
Grieving Through Art -Artist Discussion: grief can have a significant effect on ones life. Come and listen to a panel of artists share how they navigate the loss of a loved one through their art practice.

Image: E kore e ngaro, he kakano no Rangiatea,You shall never be lost for you are a sacred seed sown in the heavens, 2018

Perfume Playground Four Seasons Fragrance Series 2018 | Workshop

Perfume Playground Four Seasons Fragrance Series 2018 | Workshop

Event Saturday August 25, from 10.30am

Purchase Tickets here.

Perfume Playground hosts intimate workshops with the Auckland Art Gallery where you create a signature scent for the seasons. Come explore a Speciality Scent Lab full of top, middle and base notes. We’ve a number of native botanicals and natural aromatic isolates. Be inspired by ingredients that are ethically sourced and the highest quality in the world – you’ll feel the difference.No synthetics, parabens, glycols or petrochemicals. Organic alcohol is provided along with all perfumery equipment.

The host, Samantha Copland is trained by world renowned alchemist Mandy Aftel. Holding a science degree in Pharmacology and Psychology, certified in flower essences, aromatherapy, plant shamanism and Ronga Maori Medicine both the art and science of perfumery is covered.

With a musical and science background, we match fragrance families into each season and share knowledge of perfumery while also allowing each person creative freedom to design their own signature scent.

A hero aromatic is surrounded by your choice of essences. In Autumn, create an amber scent, think rich terracotta colours, with layers of woody, fruity, citrus, earthy or floral alchemy. Once you’ve selected essences that suit your seasonal preferences you’ll design and bottle your unique Natural Fragrance.

If you’re looking for technical knowledge about perfume-design this is for you, it’s your perfect blend of Scent, Soul & Science. You’ll learn about seasonal ingredients, the language of perfumery and how to develop a perfume accord.

Enjoy a chocolate and tea tasting before the sensory journey begins. Not only a remarkable Sensory Experience, but your own perfumed creation to take home.

See you there!

Workshop | Design your own skateboard

Workshop | Design your own skateboard

Event: Saturday August 25, from 11.00am to 2.00pm

CorpStudio, Auckland

Design and create your own unique rideable skateboard. This hands-on course encourages imagination and creativity in designing a one-off art piece that you can ride or hang.

This workshop is limited to 10 children from 8 years old +

You will explore different techniques working with skateboard decks.
All designed boards will be protected by a clear coat and ready to ride!

You’ll get messy so wear some old clothes.

The cost is $80 per person, includes material costs (blank deck, varnish and all tools included).
Walk-in welcome, you can pay in cash on the spot.

To book or for more information please contact: lucieblazedesign@gmail.com

My Untitled Body | Group Show

My Untitled Body | Group Show

Opening event Thursday August 30, from 6.00pm

Comet Project Space, Auckland

Artists: Jessica Philbrick, Aleisha Croker, Ella Ranft

My Untitled Body features a selection of works by exclusively female artists, who explore and critique societal attitudes toward their bodies.

My Untitled Body engages with narratives of women’s self-representation, and creates a space for negotiating attitudes of the past, reflecting on identity, and critiquing societal expectations of the female nude.

Image: Jessica Philbrick, ‘My Untitled Body’, Video still, 2017.

Asian Aotearoa Arts Hui 2018

Asian Aotearoa Arts Hui 2018

Wellington

For programme outline, events and workshops click here.

A gathering of New Zealand’s  leading Asian creative practitioners will take place in Wellington, this coming September 2018. Groundbreaking artists and writers such as Yuk King Tan, Tame Iti, Kerry Ann Lee, Kim Lowe, Greg Lee and Simon Kaan will all be in attendance. Creatives from all genres, levels of experience and cultural backgrounds are encouraged to participate  in the exciting programme that will explore, celebrate, and showcase diverse arts practices.

The Hui’s energetic acronym (AAAH 2018) is an apt metaphor for Aotearoa in the 21st Century, as the country is undergoing change, growth and discovery. The Māori word ‘hui’ (meeting) shares a similar meaning to the Chinese word 汇 or ‘huì’, which means ‘to converge’.

Following on from previous Hui in 2013 and 2017, the conference and public programme for 2018 in Wellington will be the biggest gathering yet.  This Hui will contribute to national conversations about arts, culture and identity, facilitate cross-cultural connections and support cultural wellbeing.

AAAH18 is supported by Massey University CoCA, Te Papa Tongarewa, Creative New Zealand, Asia New Zealand Foundation, Chinese Poll Tax Heritage Trust Wellington Access Radio, Toi Pōneke Arts Centre and Te Tuhi.

Image: Kerry Ann Lee, Kitchen Universe, 2008.

Elizabeth Thomson | The Greening of New Blueland

Elizabeth Thomson | The Greening of New Blueland

Opening event Sunday September 2, from 2.00pm

Pātaka Art + Museum, Porirua

The Greening of New Blueland presents some of the most seductive, lyrical and yet perplexing works produced by Thomson in the last 12 years. These works speak of our escalating world problems – global warming, over-fishing of the oceans, pollution and environmental degradation.

Thomson asks fundamental questions such as: how does humanity fit within the world of nature? To what extent are we part of, or distinct from our environment? Rather than offer simple answers, her works elicit feelings, reminding us of the exquisite beauty and fragility of the ecosystems we too often take for granted

Image: Elizabeth Thomson, The Greening of New Blueland, 2014

Euan Macleod | Painter

Euan Macleod | Painter

Opening event Sunday September 2, from 2.00pm

Pātaka Art + Museum, Porirua

Curated by Gregory O’Brien.

Extending the genre of self-portraiture, Macleod is an artist ‘prepared to push the boat out into uncharted waters and dare to take a risk’, as Peter Rose observed in his history of the Archibald Prize, which Macleod won in 1999. At a time when New Zealand society is thinking about environmental issues, global warming and the politics of water, McLeod’s figure-in-landscape paintings are as relevant as they are vital.

Māreikura, Wāhine beyond Suffrage | Group Exhibition

Māreikura, Wāhine beyond Suffrage | Group Exhibition

Opening event Sunday September 2, from 2.00pm

Pātaka Art + Museum, Porirua

A māreikura is an eminent woman of great standing. This exhibition tells the stories of twelve such wāhine who came from or lived in the Porirua region. From signing the Treaty of Waitangi, adding their name to the Suffrage petition, or helping their community, these women laid a path for those who came after them.

Interwoven with these stories is the work of ten contemporary women artists. These inspiring wāhine use their art to tell the stories that matter to them, to pay homage to those who have led the way, and to remake the world in their image.

Sunday September 2, at 1.30pm – MĀREIKURA – Wāhine beyond Suffrage exhibition talk by curators Alice Masters and Emma Ng

Image: Robyn Kahukiwa The Choice, 1974

(Un)conditional V  | Group Exhibtion

(Un)conditional V | Group Exhibtion

Aigantighe Art Gallery, Timaru

(Un)conditional V is a partnership project between The Physics Room and the Aigantighe Art Gallery and is part of The Physics Room’s itinerant exhibition programme in 2018. This group exhibition includes Ana Iti, Clara Wells, Kerry Ann Lee, Miranda Parkes and Tim McLaughlin, who have been invited to create site-specific works for the internal gallery and the external garden and also negotiate the connection or disconnection between the two spaces.

Acrylic Painting Outdoors | Workshop

Acrylic Painting Outdoors | Workshop

Workshop: Saturday September 8, from 10.00am to 3.30pm

The Monastery, Waikato

Join artist Raymond Jennings for our ongoing series; acrylic painting outdoors, workshop. Discover and experience the pleasure of en plein air painting in the natural environment, taking inspiration from the gardens, trees and wild life of The Monastery.

Plein air painting is a method that has been used by the masters for centuries. That alone can make it seem intimidating. Raymond will help you demystify the outdoor painting process, demonstrating how painting en plein air will help you improve all aspects of your creative work, including your ability to paint colour and light. Plein air painting isn’t just for serious artists – it’s for anyone who wants to get out in nature and have some fun.

The workshops offer a great opportunity for participants to work alongside other budding and experienced artists creating imagery and artwork together in an enchanting and stimulating environment

Total cost $185.00
Includes art tuition, all art materials, lunch and afternoon tea
Limited to 10 participants

For further information and to book click here.

Like A Boss | Group Show

Like A Boss | Group Show

Opening event Saturday September 22, from 10.30am
Franklin Art Centre, Auckland
Artists: Charlotte Benoit, Toni Gill, Claudia Jowitt, Claudia Kogachi, Jill McIntosh and Christina Pataialii
Like a Boss is a group exhibition showcasing wāhine who are emerging as trailblazers in their field. 2018 marks the 125th anniversary of women’s suffrage in Aotearoa. The commemorative period gives us a moment to question; are women’s voices being heard? Is there equality for contemporary women artists in Aotearoa?

Ioana Gordon-Smith, Pocket Histories | Artist Talk

Ioana Gordon-Smith, Pocket Histories | Artist Talk

Event: Saturday October 13, from 11.00am

The Dowse Art Museum, Wellington 

Join Te Uru curator Ioana Gordon-Smith to hear about her collaboration with artist Imogen Taylor to develop Pocket Histories, which explores three contemporary artists’ relationships with modernism

To register for this free seminar click here.