What’s possible next? | Auckland Artweek Workshop

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Art Today with Lois Perry

Art Today courses are year long but students tend to continue year after year as they gain confidence. There is no set programme for these classes but rather the course material and topics considered develop from current events in the art world. These may be exhibitions or events in New Zealand, New York, London, Sydney or elsewhere.

There is discussion on exhibitions to visit locally and interesting art places to visit overseas. We also make class trips to galleries in Auckland from time to time, and students have the opportunity to visit art events in other places with Art Today groups.

There are no examination requirements and students are encouraged to learn at their own pace.

For further information or to enrol in a class, please contact Te Tuhi
(09) 577 0138
grace@tetuhi.org.nz

Click here for Terms & Conditions.

Shannon Novak | The Expanded Gallery

Shannon Novak | The Expanded Gallery

Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin

In The Expanded Gallery, Shannon Novak explores the potential to extend his work beyond the physical boundaries of the gallery. Expanding from the gallery walls into a range of physical and digital realms, this is a project that explores the potential of an art work to create different layers and experiences across multiple sites.

Novak is a visual artist and a musician, and his work reflects his own experiences of synaesthesia – a perceptual disposition in which one sensory response triggers another (for example a visual experience triggering an associated colour or sound).  This new installation explores his interest in the ‘expanded’ experience; creating a series of layers that come together as the viewer engages with the different elements of the project in the gallery and beyond.

The Expanded Gallery begins as a physical wall-based composition; a series of abstract forms composed as Novak’s response to the gallery space.  The dynamic relationship between these shapes and colours are amplified by the introduction of light, with the composition seeping across the windows and reflecting back onto its original forms. Next, the installation places a layer of digital information over specific elements of Novak’s work.  Using a personal smartphone or tablet, viewers are invited to participate in an augmented reality experience –animated art works elegantly unfolding in digital space.

Beyond the walls of the Dunedin Public Art Gallery, this composition takes on a viral quality; it’s elements multiplying and extending across different networks that relate to the gallery in some way. Abstract compositions appear over public walls on Moray Place and the Dunedin City Council Civic Centre, each enhanced with virtual elements that may be revealed using a mobile device. More traditional painted works find their way into other sites; schools, businesses and other organisations that form part of the ‘expanded’ Dunedin Public Art Gallery network. Over the course of the installation, new elements will emerge in physical and digital forms, each operating as a trace of the original wall work, connecting it back to the source.  With each encounter or discovery, Novak makes visible the possibilities of an art work to expand across time, space and experience.

Jonathan Jones | Untitled (D21.281 GALARI BARGAN)

Jonathan Jones | Untitled (D21.281 GALARI BARGAN)

Opens Saturday June 2

Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin

In the 1920s the Australian Museum, Sydney exchanged a collection of Aboriginal and Papuan New Guinean material including a Galari (Wiradjuri) bargan (boomerang) with the Otago Museum, receiving two Māori amo (bargeboard supports) in return.  The amo, originally from the Hawkes Bay region, also connect to the unique concrete wharenui and church at Ōtākou marae on the Otago peninsula.

The ripples of colonial exchange continue to impact communities; Colonisation creating new global networks and relationships between indigenous peoples.  In early 2018 Sydney-based artist Jonathan Jones (b.1978), a member of the Wiradjuri and Kamilaroi nations of south-east Australia, visited Ōtepoti to undertake research toward a new work and discovered this connection between his Wiradjuri people and those of this rohe. Untitled (D21.281 Galari bargan) is a physical manifestation of ancestral forms and new relationships.

Gordon Walters | New Vision

Gordon Walters | New Vision

Opening Saturday July 7

Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki, Auckland

Gordon Walters is one of New Zealand’s most important modernist painters. Across six decades he explored the potential of a few simple geometric elements with a singular focus, creating works of exactitude and refinement.

Gordon Walters: New Vision is the first comprehensive survey of the artist’s complete body of work and draws on paintings from major public and private collections across New Zealand. The exhibition provides an in-depth look into the history of Walters’ development, and reveals the different art forms which fuelled his vision and inspired the creation of his own unique visual language. The original black and white koru paintings of the 1960s are brought back together for the first time and are shown alongside never-before-seen paintings, studies and notebooks.

Gordon Walters: New Vision is a partnership project between the Dunedin Public Art Gallery and Auckland Art Gallery Toi o Tāmaki with support from the Walters Estate.

Gallery entry is free for New Zealand residents, children 12 and under and Gallery Members. An admission charge applies for international visitors.

Image: Gordon Walters, Tiki II 1966
Barry Hopkins Trust Art Collection
Courtesy Waikato Museum Te Whare Taonga o Waikato and the Walters Estate

Evan Woodruffe | the world is porous

Evan Woodruffe | the world is porous

Opening event Saturday Jul 28, from 10.30am

Tauranga Art Gallery, Bay of Plenty 

Contemporary Auckland-based artist, Evan Woodruffe, has transformed the Tauranga Art Gallery atrium with layers of dramatic velvet silk and vibrant canvas works in his solo exhibition, the world is porous.

Image: Evan Woodruffe, 8th June 2018 (detail), 2018.

 

Group Show | Iconography of Revolt

Group Show | Iconography of Revolt

City Gallery, Wellington

This show considers the ways artists, filmmakers, and designers have explored and contributed to the iconography of revolt.

It excavates history, from Varvara Stepanova’s Bolshevik sportswear from the 1920s to Emory Douglas’s Black Panther newspaper graphics from the late 1960s and 1970s. It also features Belgian artist Johan Grimonprez’s harrowing collage documentary, Dial H-I-S-T-O-R-Y(1997), which explores the romantic heyday of airplane-hijacking revolutionaries through the eyes of the media.

Australian artist Marco Fusinato creates industrial enlargements of news photos of the decisive moment in riots, when a protagonist brandishes a rock against a backdrop of fire. He also invites well-known graphic designers to remake a historic protest banner in their own distinct styles.

Dress code is crucial. Los Angeles-based artist Jemima Wyman explores the rhetoric of camouflage and masks, via the Zapatistas and Anonymous. In their trademark balaclavas, Russian punk band Pussy Riot are whipped by Cossack militia at the 2014 Sochi Winter Olympics for singing ‘Putin will teach you how to love the motherland’. Plus, there’s a promotional video for the London fashion label Maharishi’s ‘Viet-Afghan Coalition’ collection.

Also featured: Jean-Luc Godard, Giovanni Intra and Michael Parekōwhai, Oliver Maxwell, Dane Mitchell, Muslimgauze, Michael Stevenson, and Rosemarie Trockel.

Image: Jemima Wyman Combat Drag: Lessons in Unlimited Expansion 2008

Call for Entries | 2019 Molly Morpeth Canaday Award Painting and Drawing

Call for Entries | 2019 Molly Morpeth Canaday Award Painting and Drawing

Entries close Sunday December 2

One of New Zealand’s longest running and most vibrant national contemporary art awards is now open for entries. The 2019 Molly Morpeth Canaday Award (MMCA) – Painting and Drawing, has more than $20,000 in prize money for emerging and established New Zealand artists. The MMCA Major Award winner will take away $10,000, while the Akel Schulte Runner Up Award-winner will receive $4,000, and $2,500 will go to the winner of the Craig’s Investment Partners Youth Award.

 Eligibility & Conditions 

  • Entry is open to all who live permanently in New Zealand or have New Zealand citizenship.
  • Each artist may submit up to two works,  a separate entry form must be completed for each entry.The entry fee is $40 per entry, fee is non-refundable
  • The work must be in the arts discipline of ‘painting and drawing’ for wall surface hanging.
  • All works must have been completed after 1st December 2017.
  • Works entered must not have been exhibited in another public art award exhibition or competition prior to
    this exhibition.

For full conditions and entry forms click here.

Image: Hugo Lindsay, 2016 Major Winner

Len Lye | Heaven and Earth

Len Lye | Heaven and Earth

Opening event Saturday August 4, from 6.00pm

Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth

Although well-known for the thrilling and sublime engineering of his kinetic sculpture, Lye’s passion for movement – across a variety of media that included film and painting too – went hand in hand with the seductive energies of the natural world.

This exhibition explores the environments that inspired Lye’s sense of wonder, from the crashing waves of his New Zealand childhood to the marvels of the heavens, both the scientific and mythic.

Image: Len Lye Moon Bead 1968. Photo Bryan James.

Sensory Agents | Group Exhibtion

Sensory Agents | Group Exhibtion

Opening event Saturday August 4, from 6.00pm

Govett-Brewster Art Gallery, New Plymouth

Work by Len Lye alongside installations and new commissions by Yuko Mohri (JP), Sergei Tcherepnin (US) and Danae Valenza (AU), three international artists working across sculpture, sound and musical composition.

Centred around Len Lye’s noise-making kinetic sculpture and a set of audio recordings held in the Len Lye Foundation Archive, Sensory Agentsfocuses on the role sound plays in Lye’s work, and links Lye to a younger generation of artists who share his interest in the capacity of sound and music to elicit sensory responses.

Image: Len Lye,  Grass 1961-1965. Len Lye Foundation Collection, Govett-Brewster Art Gallery.

Marie Shannon |  Rooms found only in the home

Marie Shannon | Rooms found only in the home

Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetū, Christchurch 

Rooms found only in the home consists of more than 30 years of wryly humorous works, including 40 photographs and five video pieces, by Auckland-based artist Marie Shannon.

Shannon frames the home as a space for making art. Her daily routine and experience as an artist, partner, friend and mother results in an art of immediacy, intimacy and wit.

Image: Marie Shannon New Zealand’s Funniest Art Video 1994.

In the Hand | Group Exhition

In the Hand | Group Exhition

Sarjeant Gallery, Whanganui 

Including works by Madeleine Child, Octavia Cook, Tessa Laird, Martin Poppelwell, Richard Parker, Lauren Lysaght, Robert McLeod and Joe Sheehan.

This exhibition includes a diverse range of works by artists who have not only made their objects by hand but have made things that could literally fit ‘in the hand’. As well as a celebration of the handmade, the works investigate the small objects we encounter in everyday life.

Image: Octavia Cook, Mosapien, 2017. Photo Sam Hartnett, courtesy of the artist and Anna Miles Gallery

Artists Wanted | Japan Festival Wellington 2018

Artists Wanted | Japan Festival Wellington 2018

Japan Festival 2018, is an exciting and quality art event which will be held in Wellington. This is a one-day event, however we are expecting a large number of visitors during the day at TSB Arena. This would be a great opportunity for artists to release their artworks to the public with other artists who also have great potential.

Applications close when quota is met.

Exhibition period: November 24

Venue: TSB Arena

What they are looking for:  A total of approximately ten artists including Japanese residents of New Zealand, New Zealanders, and foreigners, all active in the fields of contemporary art.

Exhibition description: The works displayed at the group exhibition will share the theme: “Japan.” Ten artists who live in New Zealand will exhibit their works, each unique and according to the
artist’s particular style and method of expression, yet sharing one common theme: Japan. A highlight of the exhibition will be Japanese painters’ and sculptors’ works that use delicate, traditional expressions and techniques unique to Japan. These will intrigue the Japan Festival’s visitors who are interested in Japanese culture. In addition, the contemporary artists’ works will allow visitors to catch a candid glimpse of Japan, particularly in regard to the country’s recent development and the social issues concomitant to it. A calligraphy workshop is to take place within the exhibition venue on the 24th, the day of the festival.

Specifications of artworks and exhibition space: An art exhibition booth will be set up in the central part of the first floor lobby of the TSB Arena. Ten pieces of artwork will be displayed in an austere-looking, white, cubic space made by placing partition walls in square-form.

 Two-dimensional piece: 150 x 300 cm maximum or three-dimensional piece 100 x 100 x 100 cm maximum.
*Ceiling hanging of three-dimensional pieces is not available due to the venue.
*If you plan to build larger artwork than this criteria, please let us know.

They are especially looking for: Digital artists, sculptors, ceramic artists and installation artists.

For more information, enquiries and to submit you application contact: info@mikiwatanabe.com

Call for Entries | The New Zealand Painting and Printmaking Award 2019

Call for Entries | The New Zealand Painting and Printmaking Award 2019

Entries close Friday November 9

This will be The New Zealand Painting and Printmaking Award’s 19th year, this award is an important event on the arts calendar in the Waikato and beyond. This nationally significant painting and printmaking award was established, and is hosted, by the Waikato Society of Arts. It offers one of New Zealand’s most valuable cash awards for New Zealand artists in the fields of painting and printmaking. The $20,000 prize is very generously sponsored by the Philip Vela Family Trust and they also purchase the winning artwork for their collection.

For key information and how to enter please click here or visit wsa.org.nz.

Invitation for submissions | The 4 Plinths Sculpture Award

Invitation for submissions | The 4 Plinths Sculpture Award

Application deadline Friday November 2

Forecourt of Te Papa Tongarewa, Wellington

Key Points:

  • Proposals and all information must be supplied on A3 board(s). This must be printed or drawn and arrive
    at the Wellington Sculpture Trust by Friday 2 November. Email submissions will not be considered unless arranged in advance.
  • Proposals to be accompanied by a fee of $30, cash, cheque or bank deposit
  • The selected artist receives $40,000 to fabricate and install the artwork and retains ownership of it for subsequent sale or disposal.
  • Fabrication to take place in 2019 for installation in early 2020.

The Wellington Sculpture Trust commissions temporary sculptures at two yearly intervals for siting on the four concrete ‘plinths’ on the harbour-side boundary of the forecourt of Te Papa Tongarewa, the Museum of New Zealand, Wellington.

Through the quality of the artworks installed in previous rounds, the growing awareness and reputation of the project, and the prominence of the site which is one of the most visited in New Zealand, this project provides a prestigious opportunity for established and emerging artists alike.

To date six sculptures have been commissioned in this series: Green Islands by Regan Gentry, 2008-2010; Mimetic Brotherhood by Peter Trevelyan, 2010-2012; Out of the Dusk by Joanna Langford 2012-2014; Rita Angus used to grow her own vegetables, by Glen Hayward; a (very) brief history of aotearoa by Kereama Taepa, 2016-2018 and most recently, Other Worlds by Ruth Watson. Descriptions and photographs of these can be seen on the Trust’s website

For the full brief and how to apply click here.

Image: Ruth Watson, Other Words, 2018-2020

Laura Duffy |  Garden of Purity

Laura Duffy | Garden of Purity

Courtenay Place Light Boxes, Wellington

Garden of Purity considers how we read and ingest imagery, drawing links through history from art history to advertising.Duffy sees the works as being a layered conversation about Catholicism, advertising, abjection, and queerness.She uses edible materials as a starting point for the series of digitally manipulated photographs in the light boxes and online video works. The series intends to prompt questions about traditional notions of beauty and divinity by blurring the lines between repulsion and desire.

To view the video artworks and read the text that is part of the series, visit: gardenofpurity.space

Nicola Jackson | The Bloggs

Nicola Jackson | The Bloggs

Opening event Friday August 24, from 5.30pm

Centre of Contemporary Arts, Christchurch

Nicola Jackson has created her own version of an anatomy museum, filling vitrines and cabinets with a range of curious objects and adorning the walls with paintings of inquisitive characters. Interested in the intersections of science, psychology, museology and art history, Jackson’s work often has an autobiographical element to it. It is also humanist in nature, being about any old Joe Bloggs.

From the Shore | Group Exhibition

From the Shore | Group Exhibition

Opening event Saturday September 1, from 4.00pm

Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery, Auckland 

Featuring work by Tracey Moffatt, Tanu Gago, Rob George, Nova Paul, Lisa Reihana and Tuafale Tanoa’i aka Linda T. Curated by Ioana Gordon-Smith.

From the Shore considers the influence of Māori filmmakers Barry Barclay and Merata Mita on a current generation of artists. Barclay and Mita were forerunners in making films by Māori, about Māori, for Māori. Through their work in film, television and writing, Barclay and Mita set out some core concerns of indigenous filmmaking internationally, ranging from control over production through to community-based models of filming and upending technical conventions, such as staged interviews.

From the Shore brings together contemporary works that echo Barclay and Mita’s strategies and philosophies. The exhibition takes its title from Barclay’s metaphor of indigenous cinema as ‘a camera on the shore’ that reverses the direction of the colonial gaze. Conscious of film as a political tool that could be used differently, the selected artists move between subverting conventional tropes and aiming for a fuller representation of indigenous people, places and ideas. Together, the works suggest an ongoing resonance of a rich indigenous film whakapapa and its generative potential for image-making today.

Image: Lisa Reihana, Native Portraits, 1998

Elizabeth Thomson | The Greening of New Blueland

Elizabeth Thomson | The Greening of New Blueland

Opening event Sunday September 2, from 2.00pm

Pātaka Art + Museum, Porirua

The Greening of New Blueland presents some of the most seductive, lyrical and yet perplexing works produced by Thomson in the last 12 years. These works speak of our escalating world problems – global warming, over-fishing of the oceans, pollution and environmental degradation.

Thomson asks fundamental questions such as: how does humanity fit within the world of nature? To what extent are we part of, or distinct from our environment? Rather than offer simple answers, her works elicit feelings, reminding us of the exquisite beauty and fragility of the ecosystems we too often take for granted

Image: Elizabeth Thomson, The Greening of New Blueland, 2014

Euan Macleod | Painter

Euan Macleod | Painter

Opening event Sunday September 2, from 2.00pm

Pātaka Art + Museum, Porirua

Curated by Gregory O’Brien.

Extending the genre of self-portraiture, Macleod is an artist ‘prepared to push the boat out into uncharted waters and dare to take a risk’, as Peter Rose observed in his history of the Archibald Prize, which Macleod won in 1999. At a time when New Zealand society is thinking about environmental issues, global warming and the politics of water, McLeod’s figure-in-landscape paintings are as relevant as they are vital.

Māreikura, Wāhine beyond Suffrage | Group Exhibition

Māreikura, Wāhine beyond Suffrage | Group Exhibition

Opening event Sunday September 2, from 2.00pm

Pātaka Art + Museum, Porirua

A māreikura is an eminent woman of great standing. This exhibition tells the stories of twelve such wāhine who came from or lived in the Porirua region. From signing the Treaty of Waitangi, adding their name to the Suffrage petition, or helping their community, these women laid a path for those who came after them.

Interwoven with these stories is the work of ten contemporary women artists. These inspiring wāhine use their art to tell the stories that matter to them, to pay homage to those who have led the way, and to remake the world in their image.

Sunday September 2, at 1.30pm – MĀREIKURA – Wāhine beyond Suffrage exhibition talk by curators Alice Masters and Emma Ng

Image: Robyn Kahukiwa The Choice, 1974

Charlie Jackson | Queries

Charlie Jackson | Queries

Opening event Friday September 21, from 5.30pm

CoCA Centre of Contemporary Arts, Christchurch

Taking inspiration from the ebb and flow of everyday life, Queries is comprised of photo-zines that begin to search through subjects, thought processes and experiences.

Circling back to the humble act of looking, noticing and documenting, the zines create a platform for me to experiment within, with each one communicating a single feeling or circumstance. Charlie holds a Bachelor of Fine Arts majoring in Photography from the University of Canterbury.

Wayne Youle | Arjar

Wayne Youle | Arjar

Centre of Contemporary Arts, Christchurch

Created as part of Crux★Te Punga in response to the demolition of the Hereford Street Police building, Wayne Youle’s AJAR examines ideas about space, time, and access.

AJAR began with an interest in the text found throughout the holding cells of the now-demolished Central Police building, from the formal, instructional signage intended to ‘help the process’ and ‘make the stay safe’, to the text and marks left behind by the occupants. Exploring these oppositional writings led Youle to thinking about TIME and SPACE, particularly “a shitty, cold, and unfriendly space, and time that is taken.”

Like A Boss | Group Show

Like A Boss | Group Show

Opening event Saturday September 22, from 10.30am
Franklin Art Centre, Auckland
Artists: Charlotte Benoit, Toni Gill, Claudia Jowitt, Claudia Kogachi, Jill McIntosh and Christina Pataialii
Like a Boss is a group exhibition showcasing wāhine who are emerging as trailblazers in their field. 2018 marks the 125th anniversary of women’s suffrage in Aotearoa. The commemorative period gives us a moment to question; are women’s voices being heard? Is there equality for contemporary women artists in Aotearoa?

FOUR | Kim Pieters, Charlotte Parallel, Megan Brady, Aroha Novak

FOUR | Kim Pieters, Charlotte Parallel, Megan Brady, Aroha Novak

Dunedin Public Art Gallery, Dunedin 

Since 2014, Dunedin Public Art Gallery has been running a biennial exhibition programme exploring aspects of contemporary art practice in Ōtepoti Dunedin.  FourNew Art from Dunedin takes a focused look at new projects by Kim Pieters, Aroha Novak, Charlotte Parallel and Megan Brady. Four spans drawing, installation, sound and new media, giving a glimpse into the diversity of contemporary art being produced in this region.

Biljana Popovic | Synthetic Baby

Biljana Popovic | Synthetic Baby

Opening event Wednesday September 26, from 5.30pm

The Physics Room, Christchurch 

What do you think about when you are driving? For the cybernetic subject, deep thinking happens on the skin. The car is not an object to be fetishised, but a mediated lens, a transformative and existential machine with which humans have a reciprocal relationship. The car transforms how we know the world, and how the world is.

Using two pieces of recent technology—The Fortwo Smartcar and the Samsung Gear 360 camera, Synthetic Baby opens up a historical moment—namely the early 21st century—via a dance. This dance concerns the cultural role of technology, and it takes place between two sensibilities: romantic naturalism and technophilia.

Synthetic Baby is a multimedia installation that operates as a prop-opera where cyberfeminism, pop phenomenology, and theories of embodiment come together in a period piece set in the near-past. Building from previous work, Biljana Popovic explores the relationship between identity and the designed environment through the production of new socio-spatial contexts.

Tech industries do not expand in proportion to each other; digital technology is taking over the marketplace at such a rate that older tech trades like automechanics and architecture are starting to look like blacksmithery and stonemasonry. The technophile claims it is not enough to use tools, it is the love of technology that fuels innovation—and considers technophilia to be an equally legitimate position to romantic naturalism, equally capable of fighting for social justice and earthly survival.

What does freedom to identify mean in a period of sexual revolution, pumped up bodies, the metrosexual and the ‘Can I speak to the manager haircut’? Identity is losing its grip as an organising force of the body/environment/technology/politics assemblage. The feeling that washes over is a collapse between the natural and the artificial. We were always already artificial.

Public Programme: Saturday 29 September, 2pm. Exhibition Talk with Biljana Popovic and Jamie Hanton

Image: Biljana Popovic, Something Entirely Natural, 2018, film still.

Fiona Amundsen | A Body that Lives

Fiona Amundsen | A Body that Lives

Opening event Thursday September 27, from 5.30pm

ST Paul Street Gallery, Auckland

Artist: Fiona Amundsen with Fuyuko Akiyoshi, Kayoko Ebina, Ben Kuroki, Nobuyoshi Maehira, Asumi Mizuo, Teruo Murakami, Michiko Uehara, and Mami Yamada.

A Body that Lives brings together four narratives of personal experience linked to the Asia-Pacific War (WWII). These stories focus on the experiences of American war veteran Ben Kuroki’s struggle for recognition as an American of Japanese descent who participated in the aerial firebombing of his ancestral homeland; Japanese anti-war activist Kayoko Ebina’s description of the effects of these events, and the absence of governmental recognition; Okinawan anti-war activist and volunteer from Okinawa’s Peace Memorial Museum Michiko Uehara’s childhood memories of the 1945 Battle of Okinawa; and Japanese POW war veteran Teruo Murakami’s account of a mass prison-camp breakout in Australia, where just over 1,000 Japanese POWs attempted to escape, resulting in 235 deaths.

Through a series of photographs and videos, comprising present-day and archival imagery, this exhibition explores ways in which a camera can listen* to enable relationships with alternative acts of memorialising and remembering painful experiences associated with Asia-Pacific War histories. The works seek to disrupt the unity of collective narratives promoted by official memorialisation and other forms of government acknowledgement of this conflict, thereby creating space for counter-histories that critique both Japanese and American colonial imperial war acts. A Body that Lives resists providing concrete ethical assurance regarding subjectivity and the politics of representing this now seventy-three year history. These artworks ask viewers to confront their own expectations of images and testimony—looking does not necessarily lead to knowing. There is instead a focus on other forms of knowing that are premised in an ethics of visual listening, which is based in intersubjective relationships of care, trust and love.

* This idea of listening is based on indigenous filmmaker Barry Barclay’s proposition: “I believe we might do well to further explore how to make the camera a listener. As a Māori, you are taught how to listen, you sit at the feet and open your ears…the knowledge is gifted to you at appropriate times and appropriate places.” Barry Barclay, Our Own Image: A Story of a Māori Filmmaker (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1990), 17.

Image: Fiona Amundsen, Small Tree growing near Shin-Ohasi-dori, Morishita, Koto Ward, Tokyo, 06/02/2017, 7.22 (for Ebina san and 100,000 kami), 2017. Inkjet Photograph, 1000 x 800mm. Image courtesy of the artist

Lakiloko Keakea | Fafetu

Lakiloko Keakea | Fafetu

Objectspace, Auckland

Lakiloko Keakea’s fafetu are kaleidoscopic – mesmerising, brightly-lit, and filled with an array of extraordinary patterns. While Lakiloko takes a six or seven pointed star as her frame again and again, no two pieces are identical – their interiors are each intricately singular and individual.

Fafetu is the first major solo exhibition of Lakiloko’s work, featuring pieces produced within the last two years, building on a practice of over five decades.

Lakiloko’s fafetu mix a boldness of colour with a delicacy of action – crafted using a number of distinct weaving and crochet techniques, including tio: a type of kolose (Tuvalu crochet) and lalanga (weaving with a needle). Her fafetu embody the Tuvalu approach to living; infused with repeating actions, popping colours and an undeniable vibrancy. The work holds the same bright spirit of celebration that is seen in kolose and fatele (Tuvalu dancing accompanied by song), with all rhythms leading back towards a place of culture.

Lakiloko’s fafetu are woven with an intuitive approach; emerging unplanned, without patterns, allowing colour combinations to form as the threads unspool. Her wild palette demonstrates the Tuvalu delight in vibrant colour – seen also in kolose, and Tuvalu celebratory garments. On the atolls, many of these colours are created using plant-based dyes on fibre. An expansion in material options came with Lakiloko’s move to Aotearoa in 1996, providing a greater range of bright, synthetic materials to weave alongside their natural counterparts.

The works featured in Fafetu have been created using a mix of manufactured and natural materials including wool, synthetic ribbon, cloth ribbon, and plastic cargo ties. The largest piece commissioned for the exhibition (Lakiloko’s biggest fafetu to date) has been woven for the first time on a steel frame fabricated specifically for Fafetu – expanding Lakiloko’s work to a previously untested scale.

Lakiloko is a prolific maker – in her endless rhythm of knotting and weaving, her practice is making as living – an entwining of threads with daily tasks. She continues to work at her house in Ranui, surrounded by the comings and goings of friends and relatives – her mesmerising objects emerging from the most domestic and well-known of environments – their production an integrated part of the flow of home and family.

Penny Howard | Mana Muse

Penny Howard | Mana Muse

Opening event Sunday September 30, from 2.00pm

Whitespace Contemporary Art, Auckland

enny’s artworks focus on Identity and many of them on her identity based on the Mana Wahine from her family and their stories. A red thread runs through all her paintings which is I ngā wā o mua (the Māori world view to take the past with us into the future for guidance).

This exhibition; Mana Muse is a series of portraits of contemporary, authentic, inspiring Wahine; leaders in their chosen professions, who advocate and stand up for women’s rights today particularly within their fields, which include the arts, poetry, writing, teaching, politics and all are mothers. The Wahine Penny is painting include Anika-Moa, Sia Figiel, Marama Davidson MP and Dr. Selina Tusitala Marsh, who are collaborating with her on how they want to be portrayed.

Many of Penny’s earlier paintings have included women from her ancestral line, these women include her great, great, great grandmother Ngāpuhi Tohunga, Cheifteness Te Kuri O Te Wao, and her maternal Grandmother a registered nurse who grew up with a very independent mother and without her father (because of postwar PTSD) and her partners Grandmother who was a Samoan high titled woman who immigrated to NZ (after her first husband died) to create a better life for herself and her family. All these women were hugely influential in their families as story tellers, calabash breakers, patriarchy challengers, advocates for women’s rights including the right to vote and inspirations to their grandchildren.

During the exhibition Penny will host two art workshops, these workshops will focus on turangawaewae around a significant woman in each participants life, this may include objects, cultural patterning, memories and stories told. We will be encouraging parents, grandparents, caregivers to bring their children to participate, view the artwork on display, reflect on the contemporary change making women exhibited and again reflect on and create artworks to take home about influential women in their family.

To Weave Again | Fafine Niutao | Aotearoa

To Weave Again | Fafine Niutao | Aotearoa

Objectspace, Auckland

Fafine Niutao I Aotearoa is a New Zealand-based female arts collective from Niutao Island, Tuvalu.

The group was formed in 2012 and currently numbers around 100 women, over a wide span of ages. Many of Fafine Niutao I Aotearoa’s members are based in Auckland; with a core group of elder members gathering every Thursday to make together, at the Pacifica Arts Centre, at Corban Estate Arts Centre in Henderson. As a group, the women practice a range of Tuvalu art-forms, including kolose (Tuvalu crochet), and the weaving of usable objects such as fans, baskets and trays.

To Weave Again has seen the collective return to Tuvalu mat weaving, using fibre from pandanus leaves.

As the palm-like pandanus tree does not grow in Aotearoa, pufasa (reams) of leaves have been harvested by family members on Niutao, Tuvalu, and shipped to New Zealand to resource this project. For some members, this has been a return to pandanus weaving after a break of decades, with many of the group migrating from Niutao in the late 90’s and early 2000’s. Members of Fafine Niutao I Aotearoa divided themselves into suburbs to produce these mats, with one group working in Massey, and another in Ranui (these Western suburbs are home to a large portion of Auckland’s Tuvaluan community, with many families based in this area).

The collective are now working to continue the art-form, using the customary bark and roots to dye fibre prior to weaving. A red colour is created using the root of the nonu tree, while the bark of the togo tree is scraped to produce the black. To Weave Again demonstrates the Niutao approach to pandanus weaving – incorporating motifs of dyed fibre into the main body of weaving – with coloured, decorative elements seamlessly woven in as the entire mat progresses. On other atolls, it is common to complete a plain mat, before weaving coloured motifs into the finished article.

Fafine Niutao I Aotearoa is committed to teaching young women from their community to weave – ensuring the tactile knowledge may be passed on. To Weave Again marks the beginning of an ongoing transmission of practice between locale and generations. The travelling pandanus leaves have made their own journey of migration, bringing with them an opportunity for Fafine Niutao I Aotearoa to re-engage with an integral part of Tuvalu art-making.

Image: Joyce Evoli, Muao Keakea, Faifaiga Tekino, Alefata Kauapi, 2018.

Crystal Chain Gang | Subjects Unknown Classification Pending 

Crystal Chain Gang | Subjects Unknown Classification Pending 

Opening event Tuesday October 2, from 5.30pm

The National, Christchurch

The Crystal Chain Gang artists Jim Dennison and Leanne Williams are critically acclaimed for crossing boundaries between art, design and craft. Since 2003 they have been making unique works that are recontextualised from objects and debris of our social and landscape history to create rich textured glass creations.

Artist Talk: Friday October 5, from 12.00pm

Image:  Crystal Chain GangDetail from ????, 2018

Yvonne Todd | Mime

Yvonne Todd | Mime

Opening event Wednesday October 3, from 6.00pm

Ivan Anthony, Auckland

Image: Yvonne Todd, Disco Sock, 2018

Plastic Flowers | Jo Bloggs + Fane Flaws 

Plastic Flowers | Jo Bloggs + Fane Flaws 

Opening event Sunday October 7, from 3.00pm

Muse Gallery, Havelock North

Constraints are the life blood of creativity, and Jo Bloggs has used this to good effect, restricting herself to a budget of just $20 and giving herself 2 months to create 200 small paintings of dahlias. Bloggs has managed to pull this off using mostly found materials and “op shop” bargains, a testament to her imagination and resourcefulness.

Fane Flaws, rather than focusing on the flowers per se, has taken his sophisticated graphic style with a passing nod to cubism, to explore the theme of flowers and see where it takes him.
Witty and wonderful… the exhibition is brimming with possibilities and guaranteed to delight.

 

 

Tony Lane | Votives

Tony Lane | Votives

Orexart, Auckland

Tony Lane’s work addresses the world around us through the universal language of symbols. Lane is particularly interested in the primitive way symbols subjectively and potently communicate ideas.

Lane uses trees and flowers as a metaphor for the human figure and to speak of religious ideals while shying away from direct religious iconography.

The table motif refers to connectivity – the daily rituals of human activity, the sharing of meals and conversation. The table can also be an altar.

“Art is a form of communication otherwise you’d just be making art for yourself, and why would you do that”, says Tony Lane, “… one of the great things about art is that it tries to explain the world around us. It makes connections, like a hinge.”

Image: Tony Lance, Necklace2017

Chris Corson-Scott | Evanescent Monuments

Chris Corson-Scott | Evanescent Monuments

Opening event Friday October 5, from 6.00pm

Trish Clark Gallery, Auckland

Corson-Scott produces haunting images within a global conceptual discourse, that draw our attention to the international structures that facilitate wealth extraction from individual countries’ natural resources, and the ways in which these give rise to cycles of development and decay. The photographs ask us to pay attention to the future of the planet. The quest for sustainable development in the 21st century will not, the artist argues, bypass these structures.

His extended expeditions have yielded images remarkable for their unsettling juxtapositions of historic industry within the reclaiming natural world, the remnants of industrial behemoths on which the prosperity of New Zealand was formed. In photographing sites now decayed and largely forgotten but uncovered by his diligent research, Corson-Scott captures the past before it disappears entirely. The artist utilises the old analogue technology of film and 8×10 camera, capturing light and detail in ways impossible to achieve with digital technology. Reminding us of our collective dependence upon the natural world, the artist’s understanding of patterns of human behaviour is mirrored by his sensitive capture of light, which remains the equivalent subject in his highly pertinent images of historical sites.

Image: Chris Corson-Scott, 1Limeworks, Takaka Hills (Looking Towards Abel Tasman), 2017

Still looking | Peter McLeavey and the last photograph

Still looking | Peter McLeavey and the last photograph

Opening event Friday October 5, from 6.00pm

Adam Art Gallery, Wellington

Still looking: Peter McLeavey and the last photograph,an exhibition comprising over 90 photographs from Peter McLeavey’s personal collection including important works by several key figures in the history of photography, curated by Geoffrey Batchen and Deidra Sullivan. Documentary filmmaker and early advocate of photography as a fine art medium, Luit Bieringa will open the exhibition.

John Stezaker | Collages

John Stezaker | Collages

Opening event Tuesday October 9, from 5.30pm

Starkwhite, Auckland

Stezaker’s collages pose an elegant but surreal convergence across time and material.  Through repetition, fragmentation, and superimposition, he disrupts existing narratives and instead offers disjointed, dreamlike scenarios.  While the juxtapositions may seem intentionally ambivalent and contradictory, an unlikely narrative emerges.  Landscapes become suggestive of the psyche of the individual or pair of lovers partly obscured beneath.  Images of dark caves, plunging waterfalls, or idyllic vistas allude to the unconscious and suggest a complex emotional landscape underpinning the portraits.  By adjusting, inverting and slicing separate pictures together to create unique new works of art, Stezaker explores the subversive force of found images.  “I resist subordinating the image to any concept of legible use. My aim is to free it, to let it reveal itself from behind the cloak of familiarity” he comments.

Fascinated by the lure of images, Stezaker’s four-decade long career has foreshadowed many of the concerns of our current time.  His collages exaggerate, subvert and challenge received notions of glamour, gender, and celebrity.  His work re-examines relationships to the photographic image: as documentation of truth, purveyor of memory, and symbol of modern culture.  In an era of photoshop, fake news, and image-led social media platforms, we increasingly live in a world more saturated with and controlled by images than ever before.  Stezaker’s collages know this and draw attention to the ways in which images compel their own interpretations scantly mediated by truth, language, or logic.

Text courtesy of Starkwhite.

Image: John Stezaker, Passion II, 2018

Hybrid Spring | Deborah Rundle and Layne Waerea

Hybrid Spring | Deborah Rundle and Layne Waerea

Opening event Wednesday October 10, from 5.30pm

Enjoy Public Art Gallery, Wellington 

Hybrid Spring is an exhibition by Deborah Rundle and Layne Waerea that explores contemporary notions of social hope. Resisting the cultural imperatives of individual resilience, achievement and competition that have become deeply associated with optimism, both artists grapple with the complexities of hope, specifically in relation to collectivity.

An interest in the sociopolitics of capitalism and activism is ever-present in the work of Rundle and Waerea. In the past, they have worked together, both collaboratively and in artistic collectives to explore the vigour of collective resistance—an investigation that continues to anchor conversations between their individual practices in Hybrid Spring.

The Booth | Call for Proposals

The Booth | Call for Proposals

Deadline is Sunday December 2

Gus Fisher Gallery, Auckland

As part of the new programme at The Gus Fisher Gallery there will be a dedicated site-specific space for artistic response called The Booth. This is an architecturally distinct area which once housed the original telephone booth for the building during the era occupied by TVNZ. Situated in the central Dome Gallery and near to the entrance, The Booth is a two metre high recess which is characteristic of a booth or cubicle. The uniqueness of the space lends itself to artistic responses in all media and will be a repository for new and experimental site-specific practices.

Proposals will be selected for the strength of idea and its planned realisation. The selection process will maintain the anonymity of the artist in order to focus on the strength of concept and to counter categories of ‘emerging, mid-career and established’ to delineate an artist’s career stage.

Application requirements:
Please submit a 500 word proposal that clearly describes your idea and your intentions for how you will use the space. You can submit up to 5 images or video links to work that illustrate your overall practice and intended concept for The Booth.

Please send your proposals to: gusfishergallery@auckland.ac.nz
Artist names will be removed prior to selection, in order for the proposal to be judged purely on merit.

Artists will receive:
A combined display fee and materials contribution of $500
Technical assistance
Curatorial dialogue
A display duration of 3 months

Selection criteria:
For 2019, three artists will be selected to coincide with concurrent exhibitions happening at the gallery.
The selection will be made by The Gus Fisher Gallery’s Curator of Contemporary Art and will be chosen for their strength of idea, experimental remit and consideration of The Booth’s surroundings.

Image courtesy of the Gus Fisher Gallery

Open Call For Facilitators | MEANWHILE

Open Call For Facilitators | MEANWHILE

Applications close Wednesday October 31, at 5.00pm

MEANWHILE, Wellington

MEANWHILE is seeking two enthusiastic new facilitators to join their dedicated team, to start in January 2019.

MEANWHILE has been in operation for over 2 years. They support exciting and ambitious projects by both international and Aotearoa based artists, and look forward to a bright future for their space.

Do you want to get involved in running a Contemporary Artist-Run Initiative?

Head to the website to read a brief role description.

To apply, send a relevant CV, personal statement and any questions regarding application to hello@meanwhile.gallery

Splore Festival Art Projects | Expressions of Interest

Splore Festival Art Projects | Expressions of Interest

Applications close Thursday November 15

Splore invites artists, designers, filmmakers, architects, performing artists and creatives to bring their talents to bear on a project to present within Splore. They are particularly interested in works of scale, ideas that respond to site, provoke interaction and are inherently ambitious or aspirational.

Splore has always been a festival about delivering rich experiences in both music and the arts. The role of art within Splore is a fundamental part of the festival and one which continues to develop.The most successful works have embraced the Splore culture, theme and environment and added to the festival experience with works that engage, connect and inspire the audience.

This year the theme is CELEBRATE!
Celebrate yourself! Celebrate friendship! Celebrate love, diversity, whanau and freedom! Celebrate your body! Celebrate tēnei whenua! Celebrate kindness, mother nature & sunshine! Celebrate everyday! Celebrate Splore!  We encourage proposals to consider and interpret CELEBRATE!

Their budget is limited but can assist with certain aspects such as: material/development costs, lighting, power, transport and production labour for installation.

For further details click here or email arts@splore.net

Image courtesy of Splore Festival, Jason Burgess, 2016